How did they do it?

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Dallas Landers
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How did they do it?

Post by Dallas Landers » Thu Dec 05, 2019 7:12 pm

REO Truck.JPG.jpg
I hope Herb doesnt mind me useing this from another thread. Seeing this with mud on the wheels got me thinking. Hard rubber tires and maybe 4 inches wide? I have a 60 ft articulating ,4x4 man lift with 16 in wide lugger tires and can hardly get around the house I am building in 8 inches of mud. How did these old rigs get around in the mud and mire? Did they spend 1/2 their time chaining up or pulling them out?


Rich Bingham
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Re: How did they do it?

Post by Rich Bingham » Thu Dec 05, 2019 7:49 pm

Like a moth to the flame, I’ll hazard a guess, so folks who REALLY KNOW what they’re talking about can correct me 😊

Even plowing deep, eventually you’ll nick hard-pan ! 😜 Like a locomotive on rails, narrow tires concentrate the weight, so tractive effort is most positive. Given the high clearance of the old machines, they could sink pretty deep to firm footing without being bogged down.

Wide “flotation” tires keep you from sinking deep, and that’s good so long as you have some traction. In soupy mud, you ain’t going nowhere, and with reduced ground clearance, soon as you “bottom out” you’re done. Just a thought.

PS - more than a few times I’ve seen Model Ts (and As) negotiate mud, snow and sand that left modern 4wd outfits scrambling for their winches. Same thing. Narrow tires and ample clearance.
"Get a horse !"


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Dallas Landers
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Re: How did they do it?

Post by Dallas Landers » Thu Dec 05, 2019 8:29 pm

Rich, you have my way of thinking. I have always put the tallest tire and narrow as I could get on me trucks and can count on one hand the times I have had assistance getting out in 30 years. Jobsite mud or , fire scenes or snow storms they get me through. My tires have tread, those are bolona skins.


tdump
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Re: How did they do it?

Post by tdump » Thu Dec 05, 2019 8:31 pm

For a long time military tires were narrow and tall.And those old Jeeps and trucks went places people could not walk.
My dad was on a crew that built transmission line towers.For years he had a M37 Dodge for a service truck .He would talk about how the hogs heads of the axles would leave ruts in the mud as he would drive up to a dozer to work on it on the right of way. .
If you can't help em, don't hinder em'


Burger in Spokane
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Re: How did they do it?

Post by Burger in Spokane » Thu Dec 05, 2019 9:02 pm

Rich is spot on. Fat "mudder" tires are actually counterproductive to real-life
mud mucking. But they are impressive on special event mud set ups, throwing
all sorts of terra firma toward the heavens. It is the same with snow. A narrower,
taller tire with good tread will get you through the deep stuff way better than
a wider tire. When I bought my current truck, some clown had giant "fatties" on
it. I hunted up some stock wheels and put the tallest/narrowest good all-season
tread tire I could find on them. Had the tires siped. We get a lot of snow and
ice here at 2000-3000 feet. It goes anywhere I point it. I've pulled plenty of those
"macho" trucks out of the stuck over the years.
More people are doing it today than ever before !

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Duey_C
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Re: How did they do it?

Post by Duey_C » Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:57 pm

Had a '67 Cadillac Coupe de Ville a long time ago and had used M&S tires from dad's '76 GMC 4X4 on the back. Kinda narrow lookin'.
He sure could navigate some snow tho. Maybe the 320 pound piston was in the trunk yet, don't remember.
Later the '69 Chevrolet posi pickup had similar good snow tires, even better! The 320 pound piston strapped behind the cab.
That piston makes a good chair.
:)
Since I lost my mind mind, I feel more liberated


bud delong
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Re: How did they do it?

Post by bud delong » Fri Dec 06, 2019 9:17 am

I think tall tires of any type tend to step over mud,snow,or ruts rather than plow through.Ever drive a two wheel drive tractor in deep snow and see the front wheels slide rather than roll?? :D Bud.

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Rich Eagle
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Re: How did they do it?

Post by Rich Eagle » Fri Dec 06, 2019 3:00 pm

We have seen so many photos like this one of T's mudding down the roads. I believe many kept going without time to take a picture. The ones that got stuck were the ones captured on film.
Momentum is your friend.
MudddddT.jpg
When did I do that?


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Dallas Landers
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Re: How did they do it?

Post by Dallas Landers » Fri Dec 06, 2019 4:45 pm

Leaning forward, up on the wheel must help also Rich ! Great photo of what I was talking about.

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Rich Eagle
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Re: How did they do it?

Post by Rich Eagle » Fri Dec 06, 2019 6:17 pm

Yes, leaning forward in a back and forth motion definitely helps. It can get to the point of bruising the upper rib cage but helps get the job done. If others say Umph! Umph! while rocking back and forth with you it adds to the progress.
If you have been there you understand.
When did I do that?


Burger in Spokane
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Re: How did they do it?

Post by Burger in Spokane » Sat Dec 07, 2019 1:14 am

It's an understanding you get with 20hp.
More people are doing it today than ever before !


bud delong
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Re: How did they do it?

Post by bud delong » Sat Dec 07, 2019 11:49 am

I wonder if the staged photo was either a adv for tires,tire chains,Ford,or better roads.The well dressed driver looks more like a salesman ? Uncle Sam"s tires from way back were harder than rocks and now some have a way to adjust air pressure on the go.Speaking of on the go,Rich drink more water. :D Bud. :D :D


rofirestone
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Re: How did they do it?

Post by rofirestone » Fri Dec 13, 2019 9:39 pm

The quicker you learn to drive the less pushing you have to do👏

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