‘26-‘27 Brake Shoe Alignment

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Dan B
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‘26-‘27 Brake Shoe Alignment

Post by Dan B » Fri Oct 02, 2020 9:04 pm

I have a ‘23 with a large drum (‘26-‘27) Ruckstell. I discovered that the drivers side rear hub gets hot after driving. When I removed the wheel to investigate I found that the brake shoe is not being held concentric by the four tabs in the backing plate. There is a lot of play which is allowing the shoe to move around and rub against the drum.

I am thinking that the shoe itself may be sprung and should be a tighter fit in the tabs to restrict movement. The tabs themselves are in great shape and not bent.

Does anyone have any experience with this?
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Re: ‘26-‘27 Brake Shoe Alignment

Post by JohnH » Sat Oct 03, 2020 2:15 am

The shoe should float in the four tabs. Once the drum starts rotating, it will cause the shoe to find its own centre. If the drum is hot, I would be checking the adjustment of the brake rod. With the rod disconnected at the clevis pin, it should be possible to turn the wheel freely with no drag.
The only time I've had a dragging brake is when the spring broke, causing the shoe to spring outwards against the drum.

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Re: ‘26-‘27 Brake Shoe Alignment

Post by Dan B » Sat Oct 03, 2020 6:14 am

As it is now, there is enough play that I can move the shoes in the up or down direction and the linings will over hang the backing plate by an 1/8” or more. It seems to me that if the shoes can move by that much in the retracted position, they would rub on the drum without any chance of being recentered by the drum.

I did check the brake rods and they are adjusted as they should be.
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Re: ‘26-‘27 Brake Shoe Alignment

Post by DanTreace » Sat Oct 03, 2020 8:27 am

Guess you could try to flip that shoe over to see if it is bent, just laying it on a flat surface would tell you which side is may be bent a bit. Or use a new spring, as posted the shoe should float. A bent axle would force the drum against the shoe.
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Re: ‘26-‘27 Brake Shoe Alignment

Post by Mark Nunn » Sat Oct 03, 2020 9:46 am

Check that the shoe is round with no high or low spots. The low spot will typically be 180 degrees from the cam. Remove the shoe and lay it in your drum. High and low spots will be apparent. I had to adjust my shoes to stop brake drag. To fine tune my new linings I rubbed soapstone on the inside of the drums, installed the drums (I have wires which makes this easy) and rotated them to transfer soapstone to the high spots. Careful refinement of linings with a rasp made a huge improvement.


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Re: ‘26-‘27 Brake Shoe Alignment

Post by rgould1910 » Sat Oct 03, 2020 11:07 am

Common to see 26-27 brake drum shoes out of round. I've been fortunate to find a few for my purposes that at are true. I suppose they can be trued but never tried it. I suspect you'd have to remove the liing and use heat.

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Re: ‘26-‘27 Brake Shoe Alignment

Post by Dan B » Sat Oct 03, 2020 12:34 pm

Thanks guys. Makes sense. Checking them for roundness will be my next step
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Re: ‘26-‘27 Brake Shoe Alignment

Post by Mark Gregush » Sat Oct 03, 2020 12:47 pm

Just look at the lining and shoes for wear or rub marks. Maybe there are some high spots. Unless you are using them for service brakes, they are just parking brakes.
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Re: ‘26-‘27 Brake Shoe Alignment

Post by Norman Kling » Sat Oct 03, 2020 12:52 pm

Can you see a place on the lining which shows more wear! If not concentric, the spot which is dragging should show more wear than the rest. Another thing to check is the edge of the shoe against the drum. You can usually detect this by finding a wear groove on the inner edge of the drum. This can happen when the taper in the axle or hub is worn which pulls the drum toward the shoe. To correct this problem, place a tapered shim between the axle and the hub.
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Re: ‘26-‘27 Brake Shoe Alignment

Post by Mark Nunn » Sun Oct 04, 2020 10:25 am

rgould1910 wrote:
Sat Oct 03, 2020 11:07 am
Common to see 26-27 brake drum shoes out of round. I've been fortunate to find a few for my purposes that at are true. I suppose they can be trued but never tried it. I suspect you'd have to remove the liing and use heat.
I didn't use heat to make my shoes round and I did it with the linings on. Maybe it was barbaric but I laid my shoes crosswise over an open vice and tapped on the low spots. The vice jaws were about 3" apart. I hammered from the inside of the shoe between the jaws.

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Re: ‘26-‘27 Brake Shoe Alignment

Post by Dan B » Sun Oct 04, 2020 12:40 pm

Norman Kling wrote:
Sat Oct 03, 2020 12:52 pm
Can you see a place on the lining which shows more wear! If not concentric, the spot which is dragging should show more wear than the rest. Another thing to check is the edge of the shoe against the drum. You can usually detect this by finding a wear groove on the inner edge of the drum. This can happen when the taper in the axle or hub is worn which pulls the drum toward the shoe. To correct this problem, place a tapered shim between the axle and the hub.
Norm
I did check to make sure it wasn’t the shoe rubbing on the drum. Marked the inside of the drum with chalk and went for a drive and the marks were still there afterwards. I just rebuilt this Ruckstell with the new longer axle shafts so I was certainly hoping I wouldn’t have to revert to adding shims.

I checked for roundness of the shoes inside the drum and there does not appear to be any high spots. Unfortunately I’ve been using them as a service brake to stop when needed so it’s hard to tell from the wear on the linings. The linings themselves are original and very saturated with oil and grease from over the years. We are wondering whether this is contributing to the condition since they would appear to grab and create more friction due to their tacky nature.

I tried to take a closeup of one of the tabs so you can see how much play is there. This is with the shoe pushed all the way up. I can understand that they float but again I’m surprised it would be this much. I have nothing else to compare it to though.

I don’t know how long this condition has persisted. I went for the first drive after freshly rebuilding the entire Ruckstell and was feeling around for warm spots. The axle housings themselves, bearing areas, etc are cold. Just the drum on the one side. It’s warm but not so hot that you can’t touch it. So this could have been going on for a long time.
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Re: ‘26-‘27 Brake Shoe Alignment

Post by big2bird » Sun Oct 04, 2020 12:43 pm

Switch sides. See if the issue moves.

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Re: ‘26-‘27 Brake Shoe Alignment

Post by RajoRacer » Sun Oct 04, 2020 1:18 pm

Looking at the "rivet job" on the backing plate, it appears those have been "worked over" and the tab does seem be exaggerated.

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