1925 Repro rear brake shoe fitting question...

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CJB
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1925 Repro rear brake shoe fitting question...

Post by CJB » Sat Oct 10, 2020 8:57 pm

I am replacing the rear shoes on my ‘25 speedster. The old ones are 10 years old and worn about 2 mm across the diameter.

A brake cam sleeve would work for now, but the older shoes are a larger diameter past the linings, and will scrape casting-to-drum at some point. The new shoes have lots more wear allowance in the lining.

When I installed the previous shoes I remember cutting the casting at the pivot, and also re-shaping the hole from round. There was no mention of this in the catalog or packaging — is this still the practice, and/or are there other install tips I should keep in mind?

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Stephen_heatherly
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Re: 1925 Repro rear brake shoe fitting question...

Post by Stephen_heatherly » Sat Oct 10, 2020 9:42 pm

I install the shoes in one piece. They stay in place better.

Stephen


Allan
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Re: 1925 Repro rear brake shoe fitting question...

Post by Allan » Sun Oct 11, 2020 4:55 am

The new shoes a a far superior fit. Most just bolt on and away you go, with no fettling or adjustments. I believe the original cast shoes were cast in one piece for easy machining and installed in two pieces. Those originals did quit a bit of flexing once the drum and the linings wore. Cast iron does not take to flexing very well. and the shoes tended to break in strange places. There are two sets of lugs to take two springs on the shoes. If they were ever meant to be installed in one piece, there would be no need for the second spring.
To satisfy the one piece brigade, you could partially cut through the back of the shoes at the pivot point, so that if they do break, it will be at that point. That way each half will stay in place and work as it should, provided you fit both springs.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.

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Mark Gregush
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Re: 1925 Repro rear brake shoe fitting question...

Post by Mark Gregush » Sun Oct 11, 2020 10:32 am

I think the original shoes had notch cast in that area for just that reason, if they broke it should happen there. Unless you are using the brakes as service brakes, you could have just replaced the lining. When installing the springs, hook them so they are on the backing plate side. Hooking them that way tends to pull the shoes to that direction, the other way tends to pull them away from the backing plates.
I know the voices aren't real but damn they have some good ideas! :shock:

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CJB
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Re: 1925 Repro rear brake shoe fitting question...

Post by CJB » Sun Oct 11, 2020 3:53 pm

Thanks to all for your replies.

My plan is to notch the shoes at the back pivot for “controlled breakage “ should that happen, and mount the rear return spring just in case.

The cam contact face on each shoe was noticeably worn and another factor in choosing to replace the shoes. Having said that, I’m keeping the old ones for possible future rehabilitation.

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Re: 1925 Repro rear brake shoe fitting question...

Post by DanTreace » Sun Oct 11, 2020 4:52 pm

NOS Ford cast iron brake shoe. There is no cut or notch in the rear bolt hole. Just the gap on the rear side. Ford didn't recommend cutting or breaking the shoe at this hinge end.

Ford Service Bulletin Oct. 1919 did state "is not necessary to change a brake shoe if it is cracked around the boss of the bolt hole", as the springs will retain the shoe if it becomes two pieces.
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When fitting the new shoes, the bolt shaft should be greased lightly, same as a smear of grease on the cam ends and the cam lever. The anchor bolt shouldn't be fitted tight against the shoe either, just leave a slight slop for floating the hinge end of the shoe. The nut on the end of the anchor bolt is castle and the cotter will hold the assembly tight.** Be sure to install both springs. /b]

** Oct. 1919 Service Bulletin: "When the (anchor) bolt is tight, run down the lock (castle) nut and cotter it. Then back the bolt off 1/8 to 1/4 turn."
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The best way is always the simplest. The attics of the world are cluttered up with complicated failures. Henry Ford
Don’t find fault, find a remedy; anybody can complain. Henry Ford


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Re: 1925 Repro rear brake shoe fitting question...

Post by Allan » Sun Oct 11, 2020 11:31 pm

While Ford may not have recommended cutting the brake shoe into two halves, the service bulletin obviously recognised that the shoes did break, and if at the mounting bolt, the extra spring would hold the pieces in place. While admitting to breakages, what it did not acknowledge is what could happen if it broke elsewhere! Just because Ford didn't recommend parting the shoes doesn't mean it should not be done, when it makes perfect sense to do so to avoid unnecessary breakdowns.

Allan from down under.

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