Greetings from NC

Discuss all things Model T related.
Forum rules
If you need help logging in, or have question about how something works, use the Support forum located here Support Forum
Complete set of Forum Rules Forum Rules

Topic author
NCScooter
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2020 8:09 pm
First Name: Scott
Last Name: Donaghy
Location: Hope Mills, NC

Greetings from NC

Post by NCScooter » Mon Oct 12, 2020 8:31 pm

Newbie from NC, in my late, late 50's. Been a vintage Honda Motorcycle guy for a few years so I'm moderately metrically mechanical. I'm about to be thrust into the caretaker's role of my Aunt's 26 (I think) Speedster. My uncle passed in '08 so the last time it ran was before then. I would like to know what I need to do to get her started again. Will gladly answer any late '70s Goldwing questions in exchange. :lol:
20201001_131044.jpg
20201001_131035.jpg
20201001_131023.jpg


Norman Kling
Posts: 1088
Joined: Tue Jan 08, 2019 1:39 pm
First Name: Norman
Last Name: Kling
Location: Alpine California

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by Norman Kling » Mon Oct 12, 2020 8:55 pm

It looks good! Unless the fuel system was completely drained, that is the most likely place for a problem. Old gas tends to set up like shellac and will plug the bottom of the tank, the fuel line and the carburetor. If you have a starter and a battery, you will need a new one. I would also recommend changing the oil and coolant and check oil level in rear axle and lube all grease cups, fittings, and oil all oilers. The engine will probably start right up if you have a good battery and get fuel, to the carburetor. You might want to put about a teaspoon of oil in each cylinder before you turn over the engine to oil the rings. It is possible that one or more valves could be stuck, but not necessarily so. Also air up all tires and pack front wheel bearings before you take it for a drive.
Norm


Topic author
NCScooter
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2020 8:09 pm
First Name: Scott
Last Name: Donaghy
Location: Hope Mills, NC

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by NCScooter » Mon Oct 12, 2020 9:34 pm

Norman Kling wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 8:55 pm
It looks good! Unless the fuel system was completely drained, that is the most likely place for a problem. Old gas tends to set up like shellac and will plug the bottom of the tank, the fuel line and the carburetor. If you have a starter and a battery, you will need a new one. I would also recommend changing the oil and coolant and check oil level in rear axle and lube all grease cups, fittings, and oil all oilers. The engine will probably start right up if you have a good battery and get fuel, to the carburetor. You might want to put about a teaspoon of oil in each cylinder before you turn over the engine to oil the rings. It is possible that one or more valves could be stuck, but not necessarily so. Also air up all tires and pack front wheel bearings before you take it for a drive.
Norm
Are there how to's on here for each of those operations? Is there a manual available on the innertube? I know Henry would have done that if he could have. The tires are > 12 years old. Will they need to be replaced? Will our rotund hero ever stop asking questions?

User avatar

Steve Jelf
Posts: 3047
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2019 9:37 pm
First Name: Steve
Last Name: Jelf
Location: Parkerfield, Kansas
MTFCA Number: 16175
MTFCI Number: 14758
Board Member Since: 2007
Contact:

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by Steve Jelf » Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:14 pm

As the saying goes, welcome to the affliction. I would be dubious about twelve year old tires. I know there are people who brag about driving on tires that are decades old with no problems (yet), but I also know that rubber deteriorates with age. If you do drive on them, go slow and check them often.

The main publication you want is the Ford Service Manual, but there are several other very useful books: http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG80.html.

Getting your car running is likely to be pretty easy. You may not need to do everything on this list: http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG93.html.
The inevitable often happens.
1915 Runabout
1923 Touring


jiminbartow
Posts: 479
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2019 10:55 pm
First Name: James
Last Name: Patrick
Location: Bartow, FL
MTFCA Number: 50126

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by jiminbartow » Tue Oct 13, 2020 1:24 am

Fenders and pedals are wrong for a ‘26. It is earlier. Maybe ‘24 or ‘25. Look under the hood at the drivers side of the engine above the water inlet. You should see an 8 digit number. This number will tell you the year, month and day the engine was made by comparing it with the numbers in the encyclopedia section of the forum. If the engine is original to the car, that is the year of your T. Jim Patrick.
Last edited by jiminbartow on Tue Oct 13, 2020 8:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.


Dom Denio
Posts: 129
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2019 4:36 pm
First Name: Dom
Last Name: Denio
Location: Tennessee
MTFCA Number: 27167
MTFCI Number: 20405

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by Dom Denio » Tue Oct 13, 2020 3:29 am

Scott,

To reply directly to your statement, "I would like to know what I need to do to get her started again." See the Removing a T from Mothballs document below for a complete step by step proceedure. Welcome to the hobby and best of luck with this beautiful T.

Have a great day,
Dom
REMOVING A T from Mothballs.doc
(143.5 KiB) Downloaded 9 times


Topic author
NCScooter
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2020 8:09 pm
First Name: Scott
Last Name: Donaghy
Location: Hope Mills, NC

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by NCScooter » Tue Oct 13, 2020 7:15 am

Thanks folks. Look forward to getting started on her.


Norman Kling
Posts: 1088
Joined: Tue Jan 08, 2019 1:39 pm
First Name: Norman
Last Name: Kling
Location: Alpine California

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by Norman Kling » Tue Oct 13, 2020 5:22 pm

To check to see if it gets fuel to the carburetor, first take a stick like a yardstick, or if you have a stick sold by the parts vendors with the number of gallons printed on it. Put that stick down into the gas tank all the way to the bottom. Note, your gas tank is not stock, so the readings will not be accurate, but it will let you if you have gas in the tank or if it is still liquid.
At the bottom of the tank on the outside, there should be a sediment bulb with the fuel line coming out the sediment bulb. There should also be a handle to turn a valve right above the bulb. If the handle is vertical the valve is open and if the handle is horizontal the gas flow is off. There also might be another valve under the hood next to the carburetor. This valve is not stock, but many owners install one in that location. The second valve would be open with the handle parallel to the fuel line. With both valves open you can pour a small amount of gas into the tank and see if it flows all the way to the carburetor. You can open the petcock at the bottom of the carburetor to see if gas flows out. If it does, you have gas flow in the line and through the needle valve.
Next thing pull out the spark plugs and put about a teaspoon of oil into each cylinder and then try turning over the engine. If it has not seized, it should turn in neutral. Note this should be done with the parking brake pulled back. If it won't turn over jack up one or both rear wheels. If it turns with the wheels jacked up, the clutch disks might be sticking . If it still won't turn over, something is seized up With the spark plugs back in place, and the spark lever up, turn over the engine with the choke pulled. Do this several times and if gas drips out the bottom of the carburetor, you are getting gas to the carburetor. The fuel system is free of clogs and should be working. Next try starting the car. If you still have the original ignition system the coils should buzz as the engine is turned over with the key turned to battery. If so, you are getting spark. Now try starting the engine.
I could keep on writing a book, but the club has several in print with very good do it yourself instructions. The books are: "Electrical System", "Engine", Front and Rear Axles", "Ruckstell Axle", "Carburetor","Transmission". If you don't have the owners manual and those booklets, you need to get them.
Your car is not stock. It is a "speedster". These were creations made aftermarket and many times have non-stock parts, and or parts from various year cars fitted together. So you can only tell by the engine number what year the engine was manufactrued, and even then, some previous owner might have ground off the original number and stamped in the registered number when the engine was changed. You can get an idea when the block was manufactured by the numbers molded into the metal.
If I have left out something, now is time for other posters to add or correct what I have said.
Norm

User avatar

GrandpaFord
Posts: 146
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2019 2:46 pm
First Name: Neil
Last Name: Kaminar
Location: Mebane, North Carolina
MTFCI Number: 22425

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by GrandpaFord » Tue Oct 13, 2020 9:21 pm

It will help to get an experienced Model T person to help. Search for a local club and ask for help. A barbeque will help attract help. You will find lots of guys and gals that will love to help.

User avatar

GrandpaFord
Posts: 146
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2019 2:46 pm
First Name: Neil
Last Name: Kaminar
Location: Mebane, North Carolina
MTFCI Number: 22425

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by GrandpaFord » Tue Oct 13, 2020 9:24 pm

Where in NC are you? I live in Wilkesboro and my club, the Tar Heal T's is centered in the Greensboro area.


DickC
Posts: 109
Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2019 7:51 am
First Name: Dick
Last Name: Cruickshank
Location: Angier NC

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by DickC » Wed Oct 14, 2020 8:09 am

You have come to the right place for info. I am in Angier NC which is about an hour away and I would like to invite you to join our HCCA. A great resource near you is Clyde Menges who is well known for Model T repairs. Clyde-910.263.2736

User avatar

DLodge
Posts: 395
Joined: Sat Jan 05, 2019 8:14 pm
First Name: Dick
Last Name: Lodge
Location: St. Louis MO
MTFCA Number: 19659
Board Member Since: 1999

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by DLodge » Wed Oct 14, 2020 9:55 am

GrandpaFord wrote:
Tue Oct 13, 2020 9:24 pm
Where in NC are you? I live in Wilkesboro and my club, the Tar Heal T's is centered in the Greensboro area.
Neil, that was my first thought as well. The poster's location is in the summary to the right of the screen. He is in Hope Mills NC. It's good to see these helpful responses from people in the area. Nothing beats knowledgeable help with a T.

P.S. I was born in Wilmington, but I refer to that as an accident of war. My dad was recalled to active duty in January 1941 and was stationed at Camp Davis. That's how my parents happened to be in Wilmington six weeks before Pearl Harbor. :D


Topic author
NCScooter
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2020 8:09 pm
First Name: Scott
Last Name: Donaghy
Location: Hope Mills, NC

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by NCScooter » Mon Oct 19, 2020 2:08 pm

Wow! Thanks for all the offers to help. I was at my aunt's picking it up, the innerweb is spotty at best there. I'm at work, now, I'll reply more this evening. Thanks!!!!


Topic author
NCScooter
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2020 8:09 pm
First Name: Scott
Last Name: Donaghy
Location: Hope Mills, NC

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by NCScooter » Mon Oct 19, 2020 9:21 pm

Here's what I think and have observed. There is no plate on the firewall as the firewall is part of the speedster kit as was noted above. I will check the engine per Jim. I looked down in the tank, it is completely empty, no gummy lacquer. I will check the rest of the fuel system as noted above and in the excellent articles linked. Did I mention you guys are great?! My Aunt and Uncle lived in Hampstead, near Wilmington, in the Summer and Sackett's Harbor, NY in the Winter (backwards in my opinion.) I believe he winterized the T in the Fall of 07 and fell ill in Hampstead in the Spring before he had a chance to get this toy going. We'll see. Definitely needs tires, although they seem to be holding ~40 lbs of pressure. I know they are supposed to hold 60 but I was hesitant to put that much in them for the flatbed tow home. We pushed her about 40 ft. altogether. I will perform the maintenance recommended, may seek out local help as needed and available.

Does joining the Club give me access to the literature or just the ability to purchase it? Again, I really appreciate the welcome and the pointers. I have rebuilt motorcycle carbs, I would hope this carb is less complicated. Is there a risk to using gas with ethanol-are the gaskets all cork? I'm tired, I'm blathering. Thanks.

User avatar

Steve Jelf
Posts: 3047
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2019 9:37 pm
First Name: Steve
Last Name: Jelf
Location: Parkerfield, Kansas
MTFCA Number: 16175
MTFCI Number: 14758
Board Member Since: 2007
Contact:

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by Steve Jelf » Mon Oct 19, 2020 10:11 pm

There are two national clubs, both excellent. They both sponsor tours and provide information, but most of the dues support their two fine quality magazines. Some local clubs require membership in a national club. Some states have only MTFCA affiliates, some have only MTFCI affiliates, some have both, and some have neither. Here in Kansas the local clubs are all MTFCA, and I don't get to many meetings because they are halfway across the state. You can check the MTFCA and MTFCI websites for the local affiliate closest to you. Many of us belong to both national clubs and get both magazines. Both clubs have free information on their websites, and there are other free websites with helpful information and literature.

There are two sources of Model T clincher tires: Vietnam by way of all the US dealers, and Vietnam by way of Blockley Tyre Co. The least expensive are the Vietnamese Wards Riversides from Lucas. Blockleys cost 19% more the last time I checked, but they claim to last much longer, so may be a better deal. One of our members who drives a lot of miles is currently running Blockleys, so eventually we will have a report on how well they last.

Some avoid ethanol gas, but I use it all the time. I have had two problems with it. In a splitter with an aluminum carburetor I blame ethanol gas sitting in it for months for the white powdery deposits I had to clean out. In my old Suburban I blame it for eating up the filler hose I had to replace. My T's have no aluminum carbs and no rubber fuel hoses, and ethanol gas in them has never given me a lick of trouble as far as I can tell.
The inevitable often happens.
1915 Runabout
1923 Touring


DHort
Posts: 1010
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2019 1:30 pm
First Name: DAVID
Last Name: HJORTNAES
Location: Men Falls, WI
MTFCA Number: 28762
MTFCI Number: 22402

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by DHort » Tue Oct 20, 2020 2:45 pm

The literature is sold by the dealers. The black service manual will be your bible. Keep it with you at all times. The booklets on engine, transmission, axles, carburetors, and electrical systems are sold by dealers, but were written by MTFCA members. Then you might want a copy of Bruce McCalleys encyclopedia - just loaded with information.


Topic author
NCScooter
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2020 8:09 pm
First Name: Scott
Last Name: Donaghy
Location: Hope Mills, NC

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by NCScooter » Tue Oct 20, 2020 8:45 pm

Dealers like I knew in High School? :lol: :roll:


James_B_NC
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Jan 08, 2019 7:01 am
First Name: James
Last Name: Bennington
Location: NC
Board Member Since: 2018

Re: Greetings from NC

Post by James_B_NC » Fri Oct 23, 2020 2:19 pm

Ts and vintage Honda bikes? Sounds like me with the 1970s CL125S next to my 21 pickup.
The forum's resident Millennial.

Post Reply Previous topicNext topic