preserving brass

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Art Ebeling
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preserving brass

Post by Art Ebeling » Thu Mar 28, 2019 6:22 am

What do you recommend for polishing and preserving brass parts such as firewall brackets, coilbox latches etc? Art

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Steve Jelf
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Re: preserving brass

Post by Steve Jelf » Thu Mar 28, 2019 10:24 am

What kind of oil? Which band linings? MMM?

This is one of those questions that will always get lots of differing opinions. Here's mine. There are several polishes that do a good job. The one I use is Mother's. It's effective, ubiquitous, and much less expensive than some of the others. When I was in the army over fifty years ago we all used Brasso, but what's sold under that name today is not the same, and I don't recommend it.
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Burger in Spokane
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Re: preserving brass

Post by Burger in Spokane » Thu Mar 28, 2019 10:33 am

Steve nailed it. There are a few subjects no one agrees on.

Personally, I think polished brass looks silly, like brass railings and potted ferns ...
I think 100-year-old unpolished brass with that ultimate "mellow" is the best look
there is for brass. Besides, who wants to babysit that monster of a job ? But I
prefer a natural look on most anything. Just my personal taste. I want it to look
old.

If I had to polish some brass for some reason, I would consult a metal finishing shop
and ask what they use. It probably is better than anything off the shelf at the drug
store, and probably less expensive too.
More people are doing it today than ever before !


Original Smith
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Re: preserving brass

Post by Original Smith » Thu Mar 28, 2019 10:43 am

Use the brass lamp covers that Langs sells. That way you only need to shine your brass twice a year.


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Re: preserving brass

Post by BHarper » Thu Mar 28, 2019 10:52 am

For Burger


MVC-001F.JPG

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Steve Jelf
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Re: preserving brass

Post by Steve Jelf » Thu Mar 28, 2019 10:53 am

Along the lines of Larry's suggestion, there is anti-tarnish fabric you can use to make brass covers that will preserve the shine. You'll still need to polish, of course, but not as often.
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Rich Bingham
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Re: preserving brass

Post by Rich Bingham » Thu Mar 28, 2019 12:07 pm

FYI - the "magic" cloth for lamp covers is called "Pacific Cloth".
Maybe Art is asking how to deal with small, "un-polish-able" details like coil box latches and the like ? I like "Blue Magic". Perhaps my experience has less to do with the product than our high 'n' dry southeast Idaho climate, but once polished, brass stays "pretty" for a long time, going from nearly white to mellow yellow in two years' time.

In tight places with small details like the coil box latches and lamp door catches, I use a soft tooth brush. It only takes a very small amount of "Blue Magic" to polish. I find the dry, white "slobbers" left behind from over polishing or waxing far more objectionable than tarnish. I don't mind polishing brass, I'll hit the radiator and the headlamps once a year or so . . . I even wash "Lizzie" once a year - or so - whether she needs it or not ! :lol:
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Re: preserving brass

Post by Ruxstel24 » Thu Mar 28, 2019 12:13 pm

I use Blue Magic also Rich, on aluminum though.
Similar to Mothers paste, but a little thinner and smells like ammonia. Protects pretty good too.
Works great mixed with a little elbow grease !! :D


Topic author
Art Ebeling
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Re: preserving brass

Post by Art Ebeling » Thu Mar 28, 2019 1:19 pm

Thanks for the responses. As I was typing my question I did think about this being like a"what weight oil" or "mystery oil" question. I did mean for my question to be about preserving the cleaned finish on the smaller latches, brackets, etc. Art


Rich Bingham
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Re: preserving brass

Post by Rich Bingham » Thu Mar 28, 2019 2:19 pm

Art, perhaps where this is heading is to ask whether polished brass can be coated to preserve the shine without the need to polish. The consensus is that while a number of coatings may serve that function, the inevitability of having to remove them makes them not worth the trouble. I concur.
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