Substitute for kwik poly

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Nv Bob
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Substitute for kwik poly

Post by Nv Bob » Mon Apr 15, 2019 4:08 pm

Want order some been a few years found unavailable and all sources
Links an info gone anyone found a compatible replacement


Dan McEachern
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Re: Substitute for kwik poly

Post by Dan McEachern » Mon Apr 15, 2019 5:09 pm


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dobro1956
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Re: Substitute for kwik poly

Post by dobro1956 » Mon Apr 15, 2019 7:34 pm

Found this on their facebook page
"Due to the declining health of Dale, Kwik Poly is no longer in business. We are sorry for any inconveniences this may cause you."

I wish Dale the best, and hope he gets better ...

I hate to see this product go away. I use it (and abuse it) for many, many, things ...

Maybe someone will pick up the product and continue making it at a later date.


Scott_Conger
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Re: Substitute for kwik poly

Post by Scott_Conger » Mon Apr 15, 2019 9:38 pm

I would bet that this would be a good substitute: https://atcepoxy.com/wp-content/uploads ... 02-TDS.pdf
Scott Conger

Full Flow Float Valves - deliver fuel like Henry intended!

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david_dewey
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Re: Substitute for kwik poly

Post by david_dewey » Mon Apr 15, 2019 9:46 pm

This is terrible news. I would think someone could take over the biz. I used up my "stash" fixing wooden pipes on theatre Organ we are rebuilding for the State Theatre. I had ASSUMED I could just replace the kit. UH OH. :o
T'ake care,
David Dewey


jiminbartow
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Re: Substitute for kwik poly

Post by jiminbartow » Mon Apr 15, 2019 11:52 pm

www.abatron.com. Two part 1 to 1 clear liquid epoxy called “LiquidWood”. They also have a superb 2 part wood filler epoxy called “WoodEpox. Jim Patrick


ShirkWood
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Re: Substitute for kwik poly

Post by ShirkWood » Tue Apr 16, 2019 1:26 pm

I have used Kwik Poly for many years but have since become more intrigued by the West System epoxy. The Kwik Poly has such a sort working time and doesn't seem to penetrate the wood as much as I would like. It sounds like some of the alternates mentioned here might work fine! One local fellow used Kwik Poly first to repair damaged areas of an original wood body then coated everything with West System prior to painting. The slow drying time of the West System allowed him to keep applying the epoxy until the wood wouldn't take any more. The outcome was excellent. I like the idea of having the wood (either new or old) be penetrated with epoxy to a good depth prior to applying automotive finishes. I was/am a little apprehensive about using one brand/type of epoxy over another due to bonding issues but it worked for him.


otrcman
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Re: Substitute for kwik poly

Post by otrcman » Tue Apr 16, 2019 4:14 pm

There is an argument that the "thicker" epoxies actually do a better job of penetration than do the "thin" epoxies. It goes like this:

The thin epoxies cure very rapidly. So even though the thin penetrates very fast, the time available is very short. In contrast, some thicker epoxies, about the viscosity of syrup, can cure very slowly. So the choice is between a low viscosity that has only minutes to penetrate versus a higher viscosity that has several hours to penetrate.

Another way to enhance penetration is to warm the wood prior to applying the epoxy. The idea is that the air in the warm wood expands; you might say the wood "exhales". When you coat the wood with epoxy and set the part aside to cool, the wood "inhales", drawing the epoxy into the wood pores more deeply.

The article linked below is plainly meant to sell one of the thicker brands, but it does describe the process in good detail.

https://www.epoxyworks.com/index.php/pe ... gend-myth/


Scott_Conger
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Re: Substitute for kwik poly

Post by Scott_Conger » Tue Apr 16, 2019 5:24 pm

Having been involved in envoronmental testing to MIL-STDS, that is an interesting seat-of-the-pants study, with some slight-of-hand use of facts, but on the whole, a useful layman's study of moisture exclusion properties of several epoxies as used in the construction of boats. If I had some wood with a punky spot, I'm not sure I'd be inclined to wipe at, or try to contain a viscous, oozing epoxy for 110 minutes while my upholstery or paint was at risk, much less turning the wood and the sheetmetal body into a solid inassessable assembly during the exercise. For how I would use the product, I would want a product with a short pot life, low viscosity, and minimal part adhesion to nearby assemblies (which is pretty much how I believe Kwik Poly has been used in the hobby). The study would therefor direct me away from their product...which is OK, as their product is not intended for typical use on old wood with questionable or at least modest structural properties. If a low-viscosity epoxy product postpones having to rewood an area for 20-30 years, after the wood has already given 95 years of service, that is a better option than trying to contain a high viscosity epoxy for 1/2 an afternoon and ultimately welding everything together in a shiny waterproof lump. I suppose it is all about expectations and what defines "success" for a project on an old car. I know that if I was building a boat, or wood top tables for a beer joint, I'd be calling their sales team.

My expectation is that someone in the hobby is going to read this study and soak some punky spokes in their product and expect a new wheel out of it. Time will tell.
Scott Conger

Full Flow Float Valves - deliver fuel like Henry intended!


jiminbartow
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Re: Substitute for kwik poly

Post by jiminbartow » Fri Apr 19, 2019 12:43 am

The Abatron Liquid wood epoxy (www.abatron.com), which is as thin as water, has a much longer working time than Kwik Poly which allows one plenty of time to apply it until the wood will take no more. Once it is cured it is harder than hardwood as deep as the deepest grain it was absorbed into. I have used Abatron products for 30 years and, in my book, they are the best wood restoring epoxy products available. Jim Patrick


Scott_Conger
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Re: Substitute for kwik poly

Post by Scott_Conger » Fri Apr 19, 2019 10:26 am

James

thanks for the product recommendation. This will fortunately be part of the permanent record and be searchable in the future. Sounds like an excellent product for the uses we in the old car hobby typically put this sort of product to.
Scott Conger

Full Flow Float Valves - deliver fuel like Henry intended!

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