Revisiting some fabrication

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Rich Eagle
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Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Sun Jan 13, 2019 10:52 am

Part of the fun of keeping an old car is being able to make needed parts for it. Touring and maintenance have kept me busy and I haven't had to make anything lately. I thought some parts I made years ago might be fun to post now.
When the nice repro E&J burners were only $85 I decided to try to make some from scratch. Here is the post from 2012:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/25 ... 1326907131
EJxx1.jpg
EJxx2.jpg
Whether 5 weeks making 5 of these was worth the savings is debatable but the satisfaction was more that worth it.
There isn't much we can't make if we really want to. Forum members and other car nuts have proved that.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by HornsRus » Sun Jan 13, 2019 10:59 am

if it was made once it can be done agian!!!!!!!!!!!!!! charley


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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Bingham » Sun Jan 13, 2019 11:03 am

Very impressive as usual, Rich.
Not infrequently I find reproduction items don't quite work like they should, or one detail or another is lacking. I try not to look askance when that happens, as I know how incredibly difficult the work can be from my own experiences making "stuff". If time is money, I'm just glad no one is making me pay for the fun I have making things !
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Doug Keppler » Sun Jan 13, 2019 12:34 pm

Rich your absolutely right, the satisfaction in fabricating something is defiantly worth the time put into it. Its becoming a lost art and people who don't work with their hands most of the time cant appreciate what goes into something like making those lights. Great job!
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Les Schubert » Sun Jan 13, 2019 12:38 pm

Very nice job Rich. I love making stuff too

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Sun Jan 13, 2019 1:04 pm

Thanks. That may be why I have old cars. I like working with my hands. I always appreciate the folks that make repro parts and know what they have to do to make the parts as good as possible. It would be great if they could show us how they do things but might be considered self promotion. I don't have to worry about that. The threads like this certainly inspire me and I hope to see lots more of it.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Henry K. Lee » Sun Jan 13, 2019 2:13 pm

Rich,

As my Father says, “A man who works with his body, mind, and soul..., is an artist”!

Beautiful work Rich!

All the Best,

Hank in Tin-A-See

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Doug Keppler » Sun Jan 13, 2019 3:05 pm

This was particularly satisfying, fabricating the lower rusted out patch panels on my 24 Touring, this is the rear corner that always rusts through
20161023_111703.jpg
I cut it out for a template
20161022_103830.jpg[/attachment Took me a day to hammer out the corner [attachment=3]20161022_103830.jpg
20170422_155334.jpg
20170618_105412.jpg
Don't know why the pictures posted out of order
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20190113_144209.jpg
20161022_103830.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Sun Jan 13, 2019 3:32 pm

Nicely done Doug.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Mon Jan 14, 2019 11:07 am

This is a simpler project. I needed a handle for my '15 hood.
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/70 ... 1497523020
handles.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Wed Jan 16, 2019 11:13 am

Making new sleeves for some top irons is show in this thread.
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/70 ... 1510684831
TopSleeves.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Mindless Automaton » Wed Jan 16, 2019 1:01 pm

I don't know how you formed those lamp burners. When I form parts they always look home made. My hood handles look wonky & uneven and yours look die formed.

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Wed Jan 16, 2019 1:47 pm

Maybe we make it look too easy when we just show stuff that turns out. Many of my parts do look horrible at some point and as if they can't be saved. I have a pile of things that didn't turn out. With some persistence most can be tweaked, tapped on or filed and polished to a better look.
Just keep at it.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by REHelgeson » Wed Jan 16, 2019 3:22 pm

These are the posts I enjoy. Rich I am not sure if you are an Artist or Craftsman. Most likely a little of both. Thanks for showing us you handy work and please keep it coming.


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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Dean Kiefer » Wed Jan 16, 2019 3:40 pm

When I grow up I want to be just like Rich!

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Wed Jan 16, 2019 4:14 pm

I'm just a guy who enjoys what I have seen done and try to copy.
Thanks and have fun
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Sat Jan 19, 2019 12:47 pm

Straightening panels seemed to elude me so I started building a few new ones. The more I did the better results I had. Getting the feel of working the metal helped me learn enough to tackle things I couldn’t do earlier.
I wanted to try to save this quarter panel for my ’14 Touring as it was the only one with the correct fender bead. It was so bad I had nothing to lose. Reversing a wrinkle without stretching the metal any further is the key. Using simple tools I used in fabrication I could persuade the metal nearly straight again. Clamping large areas with lumber and pressing steel flat are shown here. Further smoothing and flattening might return this to show quality by someone with more time and expertise. As this car was not to be given a glossy finish the work done was good enough for now.
14panl01.jpg
14panl02.jpg
14panl03.jpg
14panl04.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Fri Jan 25, 2019 5:19 pm

I found a '14 coil box but the lids were hard to find or expensive. It took 3 tries to make one that fit. The latch tops were lots of fun and pretty satisfying.
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/50 ... 1447541243
CBlid01.jpg
CBlid03.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by HornsRus » Fri Jan 25, 2019 5:42 pm

well! i did that about 30 years ago. but no one wanted them.everyone just cut down a 1915 ha,ha. i still have all the dies & patterns in a box somewhere.oh nice work.charley

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Fri Jan 25, 2019 5:53 pm

But wasn't it fun charley?
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by HornsRus » Fri Jan 25, 2019 6:43 pm

yea!! but i'm old and tired now ha,ha. charley

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Doug Keppler » Fri Jan 25, 2019 7:35 pm

Old and tired Charlie?, you still ride that bike in your profile picture?
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by HornsRus » Fri Jan 25, 2019 9:18 pm

yes i do but i hopped it up now my knee wont let me kick it over,so trying to rig a elc starter. charley


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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by mortier » Fri Jan 25, 2019 9:28 pm

I have a pair of E&J side lamps missing their burners. Let me know if you make any extra!

Phil

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Fri Jan 25, 2019 10:13 pm

Thanks Phil. I made what I needed but can't compete with the professionals for time or price. They do turn up when you don't need them any more. ;O)
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:17 pm

While this isn't a Model T unit the techniques could be used on anything. The rear axle brakes on my 1907 Buick were cobbled together such that they were dangerous. I tried to improve the mechanical advantage but couldn't improve the makeshift parts. I happened upon some Buick patent drawings for a different model but thought it might work. Scaling the drawing to my drum size I could trace out the parts and cut them from steel. The band is just cold rolled bar shaped around a maple block. Screws and pins are riveted and hold it together. Welding might work better but I rivet better than I weld. These work as well as a 26-27 T hand brake now. The Buick planetary had no brake. Just reverse and low drums so I need the rear brake.
REbuickBrk1.jpg
REbuickBrk2.jpg
REbuickBrk3.jpg
REbuickBrk4.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Doug Keppler » Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:56 pm

Rich, I love this thread. Keep posting your fabrications, your a brilliant guy
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There's No Substitute for Proper Lubrication

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Mon Jan 28, 2019 8:23 pm

Thanks Doug, I'll see what I can find. I carry a book of these to Swap Meets called "Things you can build at home". Occasionally someone will pick it up and get lost in it. It doesn't appeal to everyone.
I will run out but others probably have more fun stuff to add.
Rich
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Mike Thomas » Mon Jan 28, 2019 9:13 pm

I broke what I call the regulator handle on the side window on my 1925 coupe. Looked for several years, and seemed I would never find one. One day, I decided I would make one. Took three pieces, welded them up, and nickel plated it. I thought it turned out pretty good.
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New Regulator2.jpg
New Regulator1.jpg
Three Pieces.jpg
Broken Regulator.jpg

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Duey_C » Tue Jan 29, 2019 1:54 am

Holy cats Mike! That regulator look a lot like the ones for a late Center-Door project I had been waiting for and wait to do. :)
Rich, this is much fun and inspiration for me right now. As always. :-) Thank you.
In the past, I was close. But I waited a week for the idea to unfold in my head for the clutch arrangement on a Twin Y (Maytag) toy tractor for the kids and me I was working with.
I had the lever (discarded lever for something and a vee belt), and some other bits. A week later. Got it!!!
I would be remiss, Mike.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Tue Jan 29, 2019 6:22 am

Beautiful work Mike. Thanks for posting it. I have found when you make things like this that you can't find they show up at the next swap meet.
I really enjoyed seeing this.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by John Warren » Tue Jan 29, 2019 11:24 pm

Oh, the joys of owning old things :P
24-28 TA race car, 26 Canadian touring, 25 Roadster pickup, 14 Roadster, and 11AB Maxwell runabout
Keep it simple and keep a good junk pile if you want to invent something :P

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Thu Jan 31, 2019 3:45 pm

Bakelite parts can be difficult to repair. I have tried a few casting resins but they seem to dry up in their container between projects. I have found that Bondo casts well and holds up fine for me. I used it on my 1925 Tudor door handles (1999) and a radiator cap for my 1923 White (mid 80s). I make wood fixtures and sculpty clay for the molds. The pattern for the cap is maple. The cap has withstood high temperatures and the only problem is a little wear on the corners. Both items were painted with enamel paint.
BondoHandles.jpg
BondoCap.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Wed Feb 06, 2019 11:31 am

My brass radiator was missing a side. These are available but I had some sheet on hand and decided to make it. This shows some of the steps and tooling.
RadPrrts50.jpg
RadPrrts51.jpg
RadPrrts52.jpg
RadPrrts53.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by HaroldRJr » Wed Feb 06, 2019 3:39 pm

Rich - You possess two "qualities" that are unbeatable! You have fantastic metal-working skills, and extreme patience! This has so far become one of my favorite threads on this forum. The examples you have shown,on this thread as well as over the years on the old forum are nothing short of amazing! One of the first examples of your beautiful work was several years ago when you designed and built (...not sure of the right terms here) an exhaust heater assembly that fit into a Model T floorboard. Talk about "a work of art"! When you get time, why don't you show (or provide a link to) that "project" that you built,....? That was a "thing of beauty" for sure!!! .....harold


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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by HaroldRJr » Wed Feb 06, 2019 3:44 pm

Oops!!! Forgot to comment about the brass radiator! However, another obvious example of your amazing work!

Thanks for starting this thread Rich,...I'm guessing that I'm not the only one who considers it a "favorite"!

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Wed Feb 06, 2019 4:31 pm

Thanks Harold. Part of the trick is to keep a camera handy. There are many doing some nice things we don't get to see. I will put the heater pictures on in a couple of days. I remember you were the one who encouraged me to put it on it's own thread when we were talking about something else.
Take care.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Fri Feb 08, 2019 4:47 pm

I have built heater shrouds and doors for my two closed cars with heater manifolds. I had a tattered old shroud to work from but had not seen many doors so I designed my own. In addition, new carburetor stove pipes had to be made.
RichHtr1.jpg
These were for my 1922 Coupe. The grille is made out of 22 gauge and has a .100" lip around it. The slide door is 20 gauge The pictures were taken it may of 2013.
RichHtr2.jpg
RichHtr3.jpg
The below pieces were for my 1925 Tudor. These were made earlier. Perhaps 2002.
RichHtr4.jpg
There are a few more details and discussion here:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/386580.html
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by John Warren » Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:53 pm

Where there is a will, there is a way. Thanks
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Keep it simple and keep a good junk pile if you want to invent something :P

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:56 am

Yes there is John. The bumper and casting were missing from one side of my 1907 Buick rear axle assembly. The U-bolt ends had broken off with the nuts sometime in the last hundred years. They were long enough to assemble without the casting which didn't stay with the car. My plan was to make the bumper holder by welding something to a plate that would work. Sadly, no standard pipe or tubing was the right size. One day I glanced at a brake drum that came with some Model T parts. I discovered a bumper holder was hiding inside the hub. It was just a matter of machining everything away that didn't look like the holder. Dimensionally it is the same as the existing one.
The next step was to make new U-blots that were the right length. This was done by whittling some 1"x1/2" bar and threading the ends. Heating and bending (hammering) over some 1 7/8" stock finished them to specs.
Those happy discoveries make restoration fun and rewarding.
I suppose someday someone will need that hub but for now I am happy.
BKbumper1.jpg
BKbumper2.jpg
BKUboltz.jpg
When did I do that?

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by John Warren » Wed Feb 13, 2019 8:44 am

Perfect, You have a great imagination!!! It is wonderful that you took time to snap a few photos. Thanks for sharing.
24-28 TA race car, 26 Canadian touring, 25 Roadster pickup, 14 Roadster, and 11AB Maxwell runabout
Keep it simple and keep a good junk pile if you want to invent something :P

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Sun Feb 24, 2019 5:08 pm

My 1922 Coupe project had only 2 of the 6 required door hinges. I made these from flatbar by notching and bending the ends around a pin. Some careful filing made them fit like new. I don't remember exactly how I used the jig at right but it helped bend the ends. (2013) Forgive the Philips head screws. I despise them also but use them to fit things before installing the "good screws". I did anneal the ends after bending. I have made other hinges without that have worked fine.
Cphingzz1.jpg
Cphingzz2.jpg
I also would have taken better photographs if I'd know I was going to show them.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Fri Mar 08, 2019 8:48 am

My 1919 Harley Davidson has given me opportunities to learn some new skills. The gas and oil tanks were rusted out but I could see how they were constructed. The sides and pockets for the intake rocker arms were soldered in place. There were baffles and a divider in one tank that separated gas from oil were visible through the rust out. I made some maple forms to bend some sheet metal on. The filler necks were bronze and turned from bearing stock. The caps, nuts, shifter gate and shifter lever were made of steel and nickle plated. Since I knew the distance between necks I could enlarge a catalog cut of the shifter gate and trace it onto steel plate. The little pump in the tank sends extra oil to the crankcase when needed. Everything in the pictures was hand made except the frame the tanks are mounted on. Although I let car projects take over my time the Harley has increased in value more than the Ts since I bought it for $75 in 1973.
RLEHDx1.jpg
RLEHDx2.jpg
RLEHDx3.jpg
RLEHDx4.jpg
RLEHDx5.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by cudaman » Fri Mar 08, 2019 9:18 am

Wow, I am in awe! :)
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by perry kete » Fri Mar 08, 2019 11:03 am

After several tries I made this 3 foot 2 x 4 from a 6 foot 2 x 4 ! :roll: :roll:
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1922 Coupe & 1927 Touring

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Fri Mar 08, 2019 11:56 am

That is exactly where I started. Good work and keep it up.
Rich
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by tinman080 » Fri Mar 08, 2019 2:10 pm

when you are fabricating why you just take steel or wood and remove anything that doesn't look like what you want to make.....
''Just Passin' Thru.....Slowly! :D


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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Mindless Automaton » Sat Mar 09, 2019 3:17 am

I make my hinges much the same way.

And that tank is nice.

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Sat Mar 09, 2019 7:45 am

It occurred to me that I have some projects like the Harley I haven’t finished and may not finish. The upside of that is that you can always do portions of the work without it being an overwhelming task. I don’t have a pressing project this year so I can return to some other things and add to their value. Building things is always time well spent.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Tue Mar 19, 2019 8:41 am

The battered horn for my '14 needed a door for the screen at the front of it. I have one with my better horn for another car I used as a pattern. Forming .025 thick brass over a maple form was my plan. You can only form the brass so far before annealing.
HornCvr1.jpg
The brass buckles badly but can be worked. I started out with soft hammers of rubber, leather and hardwood but soon steel seemed to be the only thing that worked. Clamping shoes left over from cutting out the form worked well at one point.
HornCvr2.jpg
Feeling the propane torch wasn't fast enough I got out the acetylene torch and annealed a hole right through the piece. Oh Scrud! It is best to take your time. Soon the piece looks like it is beyond repair but have faith.
I made a second form the right thickness to allow trimming and filing to the final dimension. Too much extra material made the buckling bad but kept me from not having enough. It's a learn as you go thing. Hose clamps worked well at this point.
HornCvr3.jpg
HornCvr4.jpg
Low and behold, with a little patience the bumps work out and the brass can be filed and sanded and then polished. As the wrinkles work out the brass becomes thicker as it is being compressed. By the time you file and sand it it gets close to the original thickness again. Pretty neat. This was one days work forming the brass. Another day could make it much nicer but this one is good enough for this horn. Yes that is the same piece I started with and the hole I burned through will not show. Now, where did I put that screen I bought 20 years ago?
HornCvr8.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by otrcman » Tue Mar 19, 2019 1:39 pm

"Hose clamps worked well at this point."

Rich, were you using the hose clamp to keep the flange from moving around while you tightened up the corner radius ?

Dick

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Tue Mar 19, 2019 2:43 pm

Tapping on the upper part of the curvature tended to spread the metal way from the form. The hose clamp kept the outer edge tight. It really made a difference.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by John Warren » Tue Mar 19, 2019 9:16 pm

Rich, your skills amaze me. It is wonderful that you show the steps to perfection. Probably better keep a towel around for when people look at the Harley tank. WOW Thanks
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Thu Mar 28, 2019 12:22 pm

A few pieces had to be made for my 1914 headlamps. I have used screws but rivets would be more correct on this lower baffle plate.
Lamprtz1.jpg
The burner base curve is done using wood blocks. A standard pipe nipple is close to what the original was. A tapered rod was turned to size and swells the hole to the right size and configuration.
Lamprtz2.jpg
These elbows are just a simple machining project.
Lamprtz3.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Thu Apr 04, 2019 9:05 am

I often put a fan belt guide on a Model T. These are fairly simple to make and a copy of one original style. The arms are finished to the same shape by bolting several together and grinding and filing.
GuideG1.jpg
I braze better than I weld. The mounting shaft has a small shoulder that fits through the mounting plate and then is peened over to hold it in place.
GuideG2.jpg
I have made the guide from a solid piece also but that is a lot of whittling. Another style is offered from vendors at a reasonable price so making them is mainly for fun.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by JWalters » Fri Apr 05, 2019 1:59 am

Rich, It’s always a treat to see your work. Please keep your fabrication posts coming! Thank you for sharing with us.







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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by brendan.hoban » Fri Apr 05, 2019 6:00 am

Rich Eagle,

It is interesting to see your heater manifold for closed cars.

Here in Australia we drive RHD Model Ts with the pedal slots right over the exhaust.

So heating is not an option, it is compulsory!

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by John Warren » Fri Apr 05, 2019 8:43 am

Rich as always, Love your posts. Between you and Hank , It is quite inspiring. I have a Maxwell chimney that I have been looking for, I know that you guys could make one. I might just give it a try... :? Thanks, jw
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Fri Apr 05, 2019 9:03 am

Hi John. What does the chimney look like? I have a few Maxwell lamp parts. I have several things like that I would like to make but don't know when I might get around to it. Work for others is a tough one as things take me so long. There have been other requests and many are beyond my abilities.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by John Warren » Fri Apr 05, 2019 9:32 am

Rich, It's for a # 32 or a # 33 Maxwell head lamp. I have one of each and am trying to get a pair of one or the other. I'll get a photo this afternoon. Thanks jw
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by John Warren » Fri Apr 05, 2019 10:01 pm

image.jpg
image.jpg
image.jpg
image.jpg
My bad actually a #33 or #34
Thanks jw
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Fri Apr 05, 2019 10:20 pm

It sure looks nice John. The lettering is far beyond anything I have ever done. I have thought of doing some like that by soldering a panel in the front and back. The main shape would be easy enough to do and the holes wouldn't be a problem. Some lamps I have need that. If I ever try it I would let you know. Hopefully you will find a good original first.
There are some plain ones that look similar but probably not the same size around here somewhere.
I wish I had better news.
Rich
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by John Warren » Fri Apr 05, 2019 10:51 pm

Thanks Rich. I think I can do the lettering on the no. 34 by cutting a female component and using a dead blow hammer to pound an impression into a annealed sheet of brass. Kinda like you did with coil box lid. This is something I have done to some aircraft parts. Not sure of the best way to make the chimney. So you’re thinking 3 pieces and soldering them together. 🧐 thanks. Jw
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Fri Apr 05, 2019 10:59 pm

Have at it and let us see if you get good results. Yep, 3 pieces. Some things we haven't tried are easier than we think.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Wed Apr 10, 2019 4:42 pm

Another part I couldn't find in 1996 was a good original type rain gutter for my Tudor. I had the remains of one side so I tooled up to make some. The main tooling consisted of 2 pieces of 3/8 x 1 1/2 bar with holes drilled 12" or so apart. Also a 1/2 x 1/2 bar with grooves ground down it's length. Bending some sheet metal sheared to a measured width to 90°was the first step. Then pounding a plate or pressing some rods formed the gutter groves. I tried both methods for different gutters. The gutter is nailed to the car and a filler piece covers the nails. I pressed the filler into place but others have slid it in from the end. A filler form a measuring tape works as well as the fabricated piece I made. With some trial and error I made gutters for 2 cars. Some nice repros are available now but this was my solution.
Gutter1.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Doug Keppler » Sat Apr 13, 2019 7:37 am

Hey Rich could you post a picture of the belt guide installed, thanks Doug
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Sat Apr 13, 2019 3:05 pm

Hi Doug. A front cover bolt holds it in place. Many will tell you these are not needed if pulleys are crowned and aligned. I still install them after the belt comes off a few times. These also may cause some extra wear on the belt if things are out of whack.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Fri May 03, 2019 1:01 pm

This fan's blades had become bent up over the years. I decided to make them all the same as close as I could by pressing them in maple forms.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Wed May 15, 2019 1:46 pm

Many coil boxes have badly deteriorated switch bodies. I brought the one on the left back to life using bondo and flat black enamel.
SWx01.jpg
I took the worst one I had and cut two pieces of thin particle board to it's original shape. Using 5 original thru holes I screwed the pieces to it. Some random holes around the outside will give grip to the bondo. Masking tape helps keep the bondo from sticking to the partical board and makes it easier to separate them. I made new threaded inserts for the cover screws. Then the bondo is applied with a putty knife. Some sanding after the bondo dries and it is ready to paint.
SWx02.jpg
There are many other products that may work as well or better than bondo. I use it because it is handy and has better shelf life than some others I have tried. The Bondo radiator caps and door handles I made have held up well for many years.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Mon May 20, 2019 12:28 pm

It's fairly easy to whittle out pieces like this spark rod lever with a hacksaw and file. Not perfect but works well.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by John Warren » Tue May 21, 2019 9:36 am

Nice whittling :D Thanks as always jw
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Tue May 28, 2019 1:35 pm

My '14 frame had an original clip for the acetylene line on it. (frame upside-down in top photo) It was fairly simple to make some identical clips. I decided to make the bolts and nuts also so they would be very close to the same dimensions. The split collar allows me to mount square stock in a 3-jaw lathe chuck. The plate with holes and markings are the nuts before cutting them out. One small collar is for chucking the threaded bolt for chamfering the head. The other is for drilling the cotter pin hole.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Dallas Landers » Wed May 29, 2019 2:52 am

Thanks for showing this Rich. I am fairly new to my Rockford economy lathe. I made probably 75 bolts for the 8in1 bed out of elevator bolts but now I know how to make the square bolts and nuts thanks to these photos. Just had titainium plates installed in the C-spine today so looking and learning is about all I can do for now. Normally Im sleeping at 2:50 am but not today.


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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Original Smith » Wed May 29, 2019 11:12 am

I'm impressed with the quality of your work. You have talent that few of us have. When you did your radiator side panel, did you rivet it to the top tank? The Brassworks doesn't believe that is necessary, and I disagree. I wish someone with your knowledge would make a correct radiator, exactly like Ford did, not the way they think it should be!

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by cudaman » Wed May 29, 2019 11:21 am

Richard, you're an inspiration to us all, thank you for sharing pics of your projects! :)
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Wed May 29, 2019 1:05 pm

Dallas, I don't recall where I saw that collar trick but I spent hours setting up on a 4 jaw chuck before I did. There are a million tricks out there we won't learn.
Larry, I didn't rivet to the top tank. That would have required taking the front or back of the tank loose and my soldering is not that great. It seems I drilled holes to clear the existing rivets and soldered around them. I know what you mean about the lengths to make a good radiator. If I did radiators all the time I could make a better radiator but the time would be several times others take and not many would pay for that. At least I wouldn't. I respect your wanting thing right.
Mark, your words are always good to hear. I will note that much of my inspiration comes from this Forum lately. Also, posting things here makes them easier to find when I need to look back.
Thanks for the interest.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Thu Jun 06, 2019 9:49 am

Besides just liking to make things I thought my Mock 09 Touring didn't need to have original dash (firewall) brackets. They are a bit scarce or expensive and really aren't seen behind the hood former. Still, I wanted them to resemble the originals. Bending, welding, grinding and filing resulted in these. By bolting a flat washer to the bolt holes I could grind/file around them to give the proper appearance.
FBrkt1.jpg
FBrkt2.jpg
FBrkt3.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Bingham » Thu Jun 06, 2019 5:44 pm

Rich, I always immensely enjoy seeing your work !!
"Get a horse !"

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Thu Jun 06, 2019 6:02 pm

Thanks Rich. I was pleased to find these photos on a disk I had tucked away. I'm running out of items to post.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Fri Jun 14, 2019 11:56 am

This shows how I save my wheel bolts. By cracking the nut off the bolt and breaking the die in half I can re-thread the bolt from the center out and over the mushroomed end. A heavy 3/8-16 is the right size nut and can be thinned to the correct thickness or used as is. The nuts are much cheaper that new bolts.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Original Smith » Fri Jun 14, 2019 1:15 pm

We have some amazing talent in this club, by a number of individuals, and I applaud all of you for your efforts.
One area that needs to be addressed is the radiator. Above are examples of the brass radiators made by Ford, and currently made incorrectly by the Brassworks. Is it possible that a club member with talent would be able to correct the problem? Namely, I'm referring to attaching the side panels to the top tank with three rivets on each side, and curling around the bottom header? of the top tank the way Ford did, not the way it is currently done. Greg Gouviea, the original owner of the Brassworks did this correctly, but even he didn't attach the side panels with three rivets. Apparently neither of them realize that a Model T frame twists.

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Mon Jun 17, 2019 5:32 pm

I hear you Larry. I hope someone can take that on and make it work financially for them. It would be a stretch with the extra time it would take. Many would rather buy a less expensive radiator and not realize the possible need for repair later. You haven't thought of taking this on have you?

I thought about posting this or not. My imperfect '14 touring didn't need to use the hard to find door latches. Any around should be used on finer cars. I had plenty of later latches so I made new handles that would resemble the correct ones for 3 later latches. Those who notice the difference should get a chuckle out of them. Others might not. At any rate the photo shows the springs in the latch channel for those who haven't seen one apart.
We all make choices that fit our needs.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Mon Jul 01, 2019 6:39 pm

The Maxwell windshield frame that I had to straighten is enough like a Model T WS frame that I considered it on topic here. The vehicle had obviously hit something and bent the stanchions and upper frame. If you will excuse my combining photos I can get more on in less space.
With the use of a press, some wood blocks with half-round grooves and some key stock I persuaded this frame back to nearly straight. The photos tell the story. Going slow and watching what is happening seems to work for me. I didn't have the option of looking for a better one as with my Model t parts. The Maxwell parts are harder to locate. At the bottom of the 4th picture is the stanchion with a shaped shaft that was used to take the bend out of it. Stubbornly I saved the glass channel but found that cracks appeared after the glass was installed. This has been consistent in most of the cars I have used it in.
MaxWS02.jpg
MaxWS03.jpg
MaxWS04.jpg
MaxWS05.jpg
MaxWS06.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by John Warren » Tue Jul 02, 2019 8:35 am

Nice job Rich. Those frames are very hard to salvage like you did. Thanks for sharing.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Sun Jul 07, 2019 8:33 am

Saving the junk is part of the fun. This '14 piece saved me from making a new one. Again a square stock was put to use.
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Doug Keppler » Sun Jul 07, 2019 5:45 pm

Rich your awesomeness amazes me every day
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Sun Jul 07, 2019 7:25 pm

Thanks Doug. I'm just trying to follow in some footsteps.
Today I finished up a mixture control project. Reaching under the dash is a bit of a stretch and a little distracting to my driving. It also alarms new passengers. I recall some accessories made for this but making my own version was fun. Copying the U-joint for 1926-27 cars and the choke knob give this a look of belonging here. I had hoped to mount it below the dash but the angle was too sharp and I had to drill a hole in the dash.
MixAdjst01.jpg
The first piece was the cross. It's cut from 1/4" bar. Filing 3 sides to center in the chuck as shown. Then turning the ends.
MixAdjst03.jpg
Next I cut some 12 gauge for the arms. I traced the arm from a needle valve arm on one end. By pinning the two arm blanks together with a cut-off from the cross end I could use the first curve cutout as a guide for all the rest. Flipping the pieces as needed. This makes it easier to cut them the same. Tracing leaves a little extra metal to trim up any differences after bending. Also drilling the holes smaller allows filing after bending as the holes never line up perfectly. (at least for me) Silver soldering some shanks and drilling them for the rods was the next step. If you are like me tapping #6-32 holes is as scary as driving a T on the freeway. I don't mind buying new taps but a broken one sure ruins the part as well as the day. No problems this time fortunately.
MixAdjst04.jpg
Is it poetic justice to make the knob out of an old T axle shaft? It sure machined nicely and wasn't hardened in this area. The new parts looked nice but I had to take the shine off them with some heat and mud to match the rest of the car.
MixAdjst05.jpg
It turns a little stiffly but that will help keep it from turning by itself. The adjusting needle nut is about worn out. All the materials were leftovers from other projects. The 3/16" rods are from a coil of welding rod that was scraped years ago. I've used a dozen feet so far and a hundred or so to go. It requires some straightening but has light rust and doesn't need further de-finishing. This was a satisfying project and it's nice to be making some parts now that the lawn it caught up with.
Rich
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Tue Aug 06, 2019 8:24 am

This is a jig I made to straighten my Coupe hood. The curves often seem to get out of shape. It got this hood as close as it needs to be. (There is even some original paint on it.)
HdFRm1.jpg
HdFRm2.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by KeithG » Tue Aug 06, 2019 9:48 am

Hi Rich, Your hood straightening jig looks really good. I wonder if there could be a market for them? One T of mine could sure use it.
Thanks for posting this neat idea.
Keith
'14 Touring, '26 Roadster Pickup, '27 Fordor, '25 TT C Cab with Express Bed.
Motto: It's hard to build a garage that's tooooo big! :D

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Rich Eagle
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Fri Aug 09, 2019 8:40 am

Thanks Keith. They are easy enough to build out of scraps.

The ends of a Coupe door pull, shown at upper left, show that they break easily as they were made of pot metal or some less than durable material. I was able to make two out of aluminum stock. They shaped and polished well.
DoorPull.jpg
They have worked fine for 6 years.
DoorPull2.jpg
When did I do that?

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Mon Sep 16, 2019 11:25 am

I needed a key for my new latch on the Coupe. It seemed like fun work so I made two and saved a few bucks.
There was a Fastenal store about 100 yards from our backyard. They were used to me asking for weird stuff. I asked if they had any 1/4 X 1 1/4 key stock. Well, I thought it was funny.
The key works well except when the lock hole fills with ice. For that reason I often leave the key in place during the Winter months.
key.jpg
The Fastenal store is now a "Carpet Mart". We don't buy much there. When we moved here there was a grain field where the store is now. We used to watch the crop dusters in the evening. Beautiful! (cough, cough) I told Joy it was nice to live in the country and by the time we couldn't drive to town it would come out to us. Things change.
Rich
When did I do that?


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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Bingham » Mon Sep 16, 2019 1:21 pm

"Key stock" - perfect ! What's so funny about that ? :roll:
I stopped counting when there were 50 new houses between here and town (just those I could see from the road). That was twenty years ago. Within the past two years, I'll bet there are 50 new homes within a radius of two miles of us. So far, no Carpet Mart, but we don't need no carpet nohow. :lol: Ain't "progress" grand ? :shock:
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by 46woodduck » Mon Sep 16, 2019 6:10 pm

It's fun to make your own parts. How it used to be done before there was a parts store in every town. Part of the fun is learning how to be an amateur black smith/fabricator and build things that you may be able to buy. Much nicer to be able to say "I built that".
Life is good on the lunatic fringe. Tom


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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by wayne sheldon » Mon Sep 16, 2019 11:46 pm

Wonderful stuff here Rich E ! "Key stock", I caught it right off and I thought it was funny! However, it is generally believed I have a severely warped sense of humor.

I often make little parts and hardware. Sometimes because I want it to look more right than what I can buy locally. Sometimes because it is something simple I can make in twenty minutes and it would kill an hour to go to the hardware store. Often because I suddenly discover I don't have one, and it would need to be bought from a model T supply store. But I want it today and it would take a day or two to make the call and wait for the mail. I can make one in an hour or two, so sorry Glen C. And some reproduction parts I need to save money, and I figure I can make one for a few dollars rather than paying forty or fifty dollars for one. I would prefer to support the hobby and encourage others to manufacture things, but if I can save some dollars? That is not an option for me these days.

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Wed Sep 25, 2019 7:10 pm

Today I made new brake cam sleeves. The old ones I made 11,000 miles ago were easy to form from 20 gauge (.036"). They helped at the time but the brake shoes have worn down some more. I chose some .081 thick stock (about 14 gauge) for the new ones. It doesn't bend as easily as the thinner steel did. Fortunately I had a jig from some other project (I can't remember what now) that would work to help bend the sleeves.
BSleeve1.jpg
BSleeve2.jpg
The pictures show how I pressed the steel into a U-shape using the jig and finish bending with a vice. The final push was back in the press.
BSleeve3.jpg
These new sleeves result in the brake lever cam arm being nearly straight up (just a little before) when the shoes engage the drum. This is where the most mechanical advantage is. With the thinner sleeve the arm was about 25°to 30°forward which was not nearly as effective.
Vendors sell these but I am not sure what thickness they are.
When did I do that?

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Tue Oct 08, 2019 6:43 pm

It seems there is never enough room to pack tools and other things in a Model T for a long trip. My solution here was to put a tool tray and a motorcycle battery box in the rear floor of my early Touring. This is easier to get at tools and small parts than removing the seat cushion. It is made from plywood and I used some galvanized sheet because I had it. The tool tray is above the exhaust so things inside do get a bit warm but not bad. The tray also rests on the frame. I have put “Flex Seal” tape between hoping it will cushion it.
Box01.jpg
Box02.jpg
I am using a 12V battery. I hate to see it so I tried to make a cover that looks like it might have come from early days. Well, it makes me happy. This has worked well for several years. As I had things apart for cleaning I took these photos today.
Box03.jpg
One drawback of having things in different places is remembering what is where. Sometimes I forget and duplicate items. Just part of the game I guess.
Rich
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Wed Oct 23, 2019 9:12 am

This rotating wheel makes wet sanding wheel rims go quickly. A Model t front spindle and hub as well as some washing machine pulleys worked well for this.
rotate1.jpg
rotate2.jpg
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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Dallas Landers » Wed Oct 23, 2019 9:27 am

Not near the fun but I use a sandblaster. That would make it easy to paint as well. Think pinstripe!

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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Rich Eagle » Wed Oct 23, 2019 11:39 am

Sandblasting may be the best. My neighbors yard and my sensitive lungs have given way to my discovery of the joy of wet sanding. That and finding 80 grit for $10 a sleeve have provided me with hours of pleasure. By using some top material scraps between the grit and my figures I can sand and daydream for hours about old friends, relatives, Kalamity Dick and countless other thoughts. It can be addictive.
My Tip sandblaster got me though several restorations including 18 years building my Yellowstone Bus. I have considered building a cabinet but resort to the water bucket and the 80 grit.
I figured any product endorsed by Manny, Moe & Jack had to be a good one. I realize now it really isn't them. :)
I have preached of the powers of wet sanding for some time but fear I don't have many followers.
Do what works for you but be careful.
Rich
MMandJ.jpg
When did I do that?


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Re: Revisiting some fabrication

Post by Dallas Landers » Wed Oct 23, 2019 11:56 am

You may be onto something Rich. I bet a hand full of screws and nuts in a gas tank bolted to that thing would clean it up nice!

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