Essential tool for antique or modern car

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Roverdriver
Posts: 29
Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2019 1:24 am
First Name: Dane
Last Name: Hawley
Location: Near Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Essential tool for antique or modern car

Post by Roverdriver » Thu Jan 31, 2019 2:51 am

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Jim_PTC_GA
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First Name: James
Last Name: Fisher
Location: Peachtree City GA
MTFCA Number: 32312
Board Member Since: 2016

Re: Essential tool for antique or modern car

Post by Jim_PTC_GA » Thu Jan 31, 2019 6:55 am

I think there is a hammer for standard and metric nails to go in that tool box.
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Allan
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Last Name: Bennett
Location: Gawler, Australia

Re: Essential tool for antique or modern car

Post by Allan » Thu Jan 31, 2019 6:59 pm

Dane, that type of shifter came out many years ago, long before we went metric. I am surprised that a Rover owner/driver did not recognise that as a Whitworth and SAE combination.

Allan from down under.


Jeff Hood
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Last Name: Hood
Location: Long Beach, CA.
MTFCA Number: 25636

Re: Essential tool for antique or modern car

Post by Jeff Hood » Thu Jan 31, 2019 9:42 pm

I actually have an adjustable wrench, Craftsman if I recall correctly, that is marked 3/4 on one side and 19mm on the other.


Tmodelt
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Location: Morris, IL

Re: Essential tool for antique or modern car

Post by Tmodelt » Thu Jan 31, 2019 10:35 pm

Just to paint the full picture, my father was a carpenter by trade. Now imagine two framing nails. One head up and the other point up.
When helping him frame a house once he told me that the nails that I had pulled from my apron that had the point up were for the other side of the house.

In a past life, I worked in a steel fabrication shop. We had a tool affectionately called "The Old Man" due to the fact that it would make an old man out of you if you had to use it. One of the "helpers" was told to go get "The Old Man". He came back with the boss.

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