brass gas line from lamps to carbide tank

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Colin Mavins
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brass gas line from lamps to carbide tank

Post by Colin Mavins » Wed Jan 22, 2020 3:05 pm

This is my winter project I have collected all the information I can find from here and the internet in regard to this gas line. Most of this information and pictures are for 1911 the question is would it be the same in 1912 I think it should be the same but I could be wrong I'm guessing. In Dads parts boxes I have found a brass T fitting 6 inches of brass pipe which is broken off 1 clamp and 1 frame bracket. I am guess this was the remains of the line from our car which he did not put back on the car.


Scott Rosenthal
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Re: brass gas line from lamps to carbide tank

Post by Scott Rosenthal » Thu Jan 23, 2020 8:50 am

Hello Collin:
May I ask whether this is to be a serviceable carbide system when complete? If so, you may recall previous posts that discussed the reliability of brass tubing, where this material is fracture prone. A practical solution for carbide and fuel brass line replacement is the Copper Nickel brake line that NAPA sells for hot rods. This polishes to look more like bronze than brass, but has excellent bend quality and strength far superior to brass. Hope this is helpful.
Regards,
Scott


Scott_Conger
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Re: brass gas line from lamps to carbide tank

Post by Scott_Conger » Thu Jan 23, 2020 11:18 am

Scott

it is good of you to post this warning to Colin. No material with a copper content above 64% should ever be used. When it comes to acetylene, ALWAYS KNOW WHAT YOU'RE WORKING WITH.
Scott Conger

Full Flow Float Valves - deliver fuel like Henry intended!


Topic author
Colin Mavins
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Re: brass gas line from lamps to carbide tank

Post by Colin Mavins » Thu Jan 23, 2020 11:41 am

Thanks for the info I would like it to work just so I can say they work , in cleaning out the shop I found the pieces the car has had mag lights since 1915 Dr Bond installed them and they have been there ever since.

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namdc3
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Re: brass gas line from lamps to carbide tank

Post by namdc3 » Thu Jan 23, 2020 3:45 pm

I used stainless steel line, painted black. I filed down a stainless tee fitting so that it looked like an old cast fitting once painted. If I recall correctly, hose clamps weren't originally used; I used a brake flaring tool to create a little bump just in from the tubing ends, which creates a nice seal to the inside of the hose but isn't really detectable through the hose. The generator only creates a couple psi.


Drkbp
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Re: brass gas line from lamps to carbide tank

Post by Drkbp » Thu Jan 23, 2020 7:02 pm

Colin,

Does your '12 radiator have the 1/2" gas hose holes in the side plates near the bottom?

Ken

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Re: brass gas line from lamps to carbide tank

Post by KWTownsend » Thu Jan 23, 2020 8:50 pm

Colin-
I believe the 1912 gas line along the frame is about the same as the 1911, however by 1912 they had begun to use the cross-over tube that was attached to the radiator. From the cross over tube to the lamps would just be the red rubber hose.

Here is a 1913-1914 radiator with the cross-over tube:
1913-1914 acetylene tube radiator.jpg
Note the holes in the side panel used in 1913-14



Here is a diagram of how Brassworks makes their brass radiator:
1912 radiator gas tube.jpg
The 1912 radiator does not have the holes in the side panel.
(The note about the gas light tube used from 1909-1914 is incorrect. It would have been only 1912-1914. I have no idea if the gas light tube that Brassworks makes is accurate or not.

: ^ )

Keith

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