reperduction coils

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Chuck Stevens
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reperduction coils

Post by Chuck Stevens » Tue Feb 25, 2020 8:43 am

Has anyone used the black plastic coils for any length of time, are they good for tours, dependable?

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Steve Jelf
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Re: reperduction coils

Post by Steve Jelf » Tue Feb 25, 2020 9:10 am

Experiences vary. Some say they've never had a problem. Others say they have. Maybe one of the coil specialists can give us an opinion.
The inevitable often happens.
1915 Runabout
1923 Touring


Humblej
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Re: reperduction coils

Post by Humblej » Tue Feb 25, 2020 9:24 am

I have been using the same plastic coils for 50 years.


John kuehn
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Re: reperduction coils

Post by John kuehn » Tue Feb 25, 2020 9:54 am

Different views if they are good or not. I would say if they work use them. Why not.


Adam
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Re: reperduction coils

Post by Adam » Tue Feb 25, 2020 10:11 am

Some people have been lucky and appear to have had good luck with them. They work fine on battery, but can be somewhat problematic on magneto. They can be difficult to set up on a HCCT and some are impossible to set up properly. I rebuild coils and I won’t rebuild plastic coils because the end product isn’t nearly as good as a genuine Ford coil. The best coils around are rebuilt original Ford coils from an experienced coil rebuilder. The price is generally lower and the warranty is usually even much better too.


Ron Patterson
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Re: reperduction coils

Post by Ron Patterson » Tue Feb 25, 2020 10:44 am

This reply pertains to mid year 1913 and later Model T coils.
I fully agree with Adam Doleshal and would add that most people are not aware that the black plastic coils are now made in various version based upon their intended application. The very early plastic coils (circa 1960) can be made to work well on the magneto, but later versions that were modified to be used for different electrical applications (not Model T) are impossible to get working correctly on the magneto because they are designed for DC application of varying voltage. It is not easy to differentiate between them.
Some people like plastic coils because they are fit buggered up coil boxes and won't fix the coilbox.
If your coilbox has been rebuilt and is in good shape, you have gotten rid of the coilbox wood back and bottom, coat your rebuilt Ford coils with paraffin so they will not swell up due to changing humidity they will be very easy to install and remove from the coilbox. .
If you plan using original Model T coils the best place to start is with a Ford script coil and have it rebuilt by a competent coil re-builder who understands how the coil works electrically and knows how to operate a proper testing apparatus.
Many Model T era aftermarket Model coils (Kingston, KW, Kokomo Electric etc.) can also be successfully rebuilt and made to work well.
Of the three or four reproduction coils made today only one of them is worth a damn.
Ron the Coilman, in my 30th year of Model T coil rebuilding and just finished my 22,115th rebuilt Model T coil.

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RustyFords
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Re: reperduction coils

Post by RustyFords » Tue Feb 25, 2020 11:02 am

Ron...I recently received two rebuilt coils from you (that I ordered through Langs) and my 24 Touring is very happy with them (he's very picky and lets me know immediately about imperfect coils).

That, combined with the rebuilt generator I bought from you makes for a very happy little Flivver.
1924 Touring


Original Smith
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Re: reperduction coils

Post by Original Smith » Tue Feb 25, 2020 11:51 am

I have Ron's rebuilt Ford Script coils in my 1925. I've driven this car over 6,500 miles since I restored it. I have never had the lid off the coilbox. Go figure!

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Mark Nunn
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Re: Reproduction coils

Post by Mark Nunn » Tue Feb 25, 2020 1:37 pm

Comments about coils working better or worse depending on whether the car is running on battery or magneto has me wondering.

Is there a different coil calibration for cars running solely on 6V battery? I don't have a magneto and I don't want a distributor. When I have my coils calibrated later this year, does the rebuilder care? My engine runs fine on battery. But then, I have never driven it beyond my driveway. I'm working to change that.


Scott_Conger
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Re: reperduction coils

Post by Scott_Conger » Tue Feb 25, 2020 2:38 pm

Mark

there are indeed "tricks" to make a car run well on 6V (or at least the very best that it can on 6V). Feel free to contact me via email system if you are interested in knowing more.
Scott Conger

Full Flow Float Valves - deliver fuel like Henry intended!

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Steve Jelf
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Re: reperduction coils

Post by Steve Jelf » Tue Feb 25, 2020 3:33 pm

Thanks to Ron for the paraffin suggestion. I've used a candle to help many other things slide, but never thought of it for getting those stubborn coils out of the box.
The inevitable often happens.
1915 Runabout
1923 Touring


Ron Patterson
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Re: Reproduction coils

Post by Ron Patterson » Tue Feb 25, 2020 4:14 pm

The problems with operating a properly set up Model T Ford ignition system on 6 Volts only are not commonly understood.
Many years ago Steve Coniff and I co-wrote an article describing the fundamentals of the commonly misunderstood Model T Ford ignition system.
Here is a link to that article entitled "The Model T Ford Ignition System and Spark Timing": http://www.funprojects.com/pdf/Model%20 ... iticle.pdf
Soon after I realized another article was in order to explain the issues with operating the Model T on magneto and 6 Volts only.
Here is a link to the second article entitled "More on Model T Ford Spark Timing": http://www.funprojects.com/pdf/More%20o ... Timing.pdf
If you are not fully versed on how a properly set up Model T ignition systems works, read the first article.
Then read the second article which discusses why the Model T runs better on magneto than on battery and why problem that occur at higher speeds when running on 6 volts only.
These articles first appeared in the Vintage Ford and Model T Times magazines.
If you have any questions let me know.

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