running out of gas

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Chuck Stevens
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running out of gas

Post by Chuck Stevens » Fri Sep 11, 2020 8:19 am

I have a 21 roadster with the stock 9 gal tank, everything is stock the way it left the factory. We live in upstate ny so most seasonal roads have hills, and of coarse they are dirt. As we climbed this good size hill with a "S" curve half way up, ol lizzy coughed and died. I tried the starter... nothing. We coasted back down and got turned around, high gear and she started right up. I was very curious about the fuel level so I checked it at home, 6 + gallons. I guess it was a combination of low gear, steep hill, and the s turn, she ran perfect all the way home. Lesson learned, know the road before you get there


Norman Kling
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Re: running out of gas

Post by Norman Kling » Fri Sep 11, 2020 9:11 am

In hilly country, it is always a good idea to keep the tank full. I can go up a 6%grade in high gear without a problem. Never had it run out when above 2 gallons. However on the way home there is one hill which takes both Ruckstell and Low pedal to climb, and I wouldn't even attempt to climb in the 22, however I can go right up in the 26. Fortunately there is another way around and it takes only Ruckstell Ford high and it goes up fine. It has run out once on that hill and I had to get turned around but there is a gas station at the foot of the hill. So If it is less than half full, I fill it up before climbing that hill. Even in the 26 it is better to take the less steep hill most of the time because not only will you run out of gas on a steep hill, but if your hill is very long you could have problems with the bearings in the front of the engine because of oil starvation.
Norm

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GrandpaFord
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Re: running out of gas

Post by GrandpaFord » Fri Sep 11, 2020 10:17 am

There are lots of people who will disagree with me but I use exhaust gas pressure in the tank and can climb steep hills with only a gallon of gas in the tank. Only a few inches of water pressure is needed to push the gasoline to the carburetor. The pressure builds up when going up hills because the engine is pulling and producing a lot of exhaust, exactly when it is needed. The exhaust contains mostly carbon dioxide, a non combustible gas, which is safer in the gasoline tank than air which contains oxygen. I use a small diameter copper tube which is long in length and coiled under the seat. The copper tubing cools the exhaust gas so that it is at the same temperature of the air under the seat when it reaches the tank. When cresting the hill the exhaust pressure is reduced and the flow is reversed. The gasoline fumes that reach the exhaust pipe are miniscule and mix with the gasoline fumes already in the exhaust pipe without any consequence. The vent in the cap is closed off and a tap added to the top of the tank for the tubing. I use an O ring on the cap as a gasket. One added advantages is that I don't have to live with fumes coming from the cap vent.

People have said that I am going to blow myself up, but i have used this system for years and know of other Model T owners that use the same systems. I have promised to let everyone know is I kill myself.
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tmodeldriver
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Re: running out of gas

Post by tmodeldriver » Fri Sep 11, 2020 11:50 am

Seems to me that the space inside the gas tank will be so rich with gas fumes that you'd almost have to insert pure oxygen to achieve a combustible mixture. I'd feel completely safe piping exhaust gasses into the tank. Here in Florida the hills are just the overpasses and they don't give us much trouble.

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Steve Jelf
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Re: running out of gas

Post by Steve Jelf » Fri Sep 11, 2020 12:35 pm

I never leave home without my running board cans. They have saved me a long unscheduled walk several times. On level ground two gallons of gas is plenty, but one is not enough.
The inevitable often happens.
1915 Runabout
1923 Touring


Aarongriffey
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Re: running out of gas

Post by Aarongriffey » Fri Sep 11, 2020 6:27 pm

Grandpa Ford,
There is nothing wrong with using exhaust pressure on the gas tank.
Some of the very first Mercedes cars had the fuel tank at the rear and used exhaust pressure to push the fuel up to the engine.
A few years ago I found an advertisement from a guy on the west coast that was selling a pipe that went between the carb and the manifold to lower the carb several inches to help on hills.
There was also small tank that’s a down on the right side at the bottom of the radiator.
It would fill from the regular tank when on level ground but held enough fuel to get you up any hill.
It would be higher than the carb when going uphill.


Russ T Fender
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Re: running out of gas

Post by Russ T Fender » Fri Sep 11, 2020 7:33 pm

The early 40 h.p. Chalmers Detroits used exhaust pressure to compensate for the lower gas tank on the racier runabouts. The tank was too low for gravity feed. My Touring car has the seat much higher so it was unnecessary but the manifolds are the same and there is a plug in mine where the connection to the tank was made for the runabouts.


Dan Hatch
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Re: running out of gas

Post by Dan Hatch » Fri Sep 11, 2020 7:53 pm

You do not say if you are running a Holley NH, but if you are. Get one of Scott Conger new float valves. They flow more fuel and help with hill climbing. Dan

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DanTreace
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Re: running out of gas

Post by DanTreace » Fri Sep 11, 2020 8:13 pm

Similarly, be sure your fuel line is supplying full flow, as the underseat tank only uses gravity and any restriction can cause fuel stumble on hills.

Happened before with the '25 touring, had good gas tank level, but died on hill on a Virginia tour. Rolled to level and ran fine, came to explore the sediment bulb, and found the screen covered with debris, that let enough gas for good level running, but not enough flow for hills. Replaced the screen and can climb hills again.
The best way is always the simplest. The attics of the world are cluttered up with complicated failures. Henry Ford
Don’t find fault, find a remedy; anybody can complain. Henry Ford

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TRDxB2
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Re: running out of gas

Post by TRDxB2 » Fri Sep 11, 2020 8:54 pm

I don't want this to start a discussion on ethanol fuels since its about combustion in general. Water vapor is a result of a carbon based fuel and oxygen. Cooling the gases in the copper tube may act as a still causing the gases to condense. I'm certain you have been behind a car at a stop light only to see so fluid dripping from their tail pipe as the took off. Likely water vapor and/or unburned fuel. What is being pumped into the tank is likely Nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, water, particulate matter, hydrocarbons, sulfur dioxide and etc. Not a problem if you draft off a pint from the sediment bulb to remove what ails the engine now and then.
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