1927 Coupe Windshield Question

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BLB27
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1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by BLB27 » Sun Oct 25, 2020 8:57 pm

There are five fasteners that connect the top of the windshield to the panel above it. Are these screws or small bolts with nuts?


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by ModelTWoods » Mon Oct 26, 2020 12:44 am

Gee, Bruce, maybe someone else has had their windshield out more recently; I don't remember. I do know that there are two types of hinges that were used. The early cars, starting in 26, had a one piece piano hinge. Sometime in production, Ford when to an interlocking grooved hinge like some of the Model A's used. I stand to be corrected on this.


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by Humblej » Mon Oct 26, 2020 7:20 am

Nuts and bolts hold it, you need to get the header upholstery panel off to get to the nuts.


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by Adam » Mon Oct 26, 2020 10:02 am

If I remember correctly, the early and late style hinges aren’t interchangeable because the fastener locations/style are different.


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by jiminbartow » Mon Oct 26, 2020 11:36 am

When I removed the windshield, secured in place by a one piece piano hinge, from my ‘26 coupe in 1970, the header was missing so it was easy to see the 3/4” access holes in line with each oval head machine screw going into the hollow panel, allowing one to gain access to the nut with an end wrench. You’ll need to disconnect the windshield studs on each side from the slide brackets and will need a helper to hold the windshield frame as wide open as possible to expose the hinge and screws so you can you loosen the screws with a standard screwdriver while holding the nut on the inside with an end wrench. Your helper will also need hold the frame to keep the frame from falling onto and damaging the cowl, or frame. If you are like me and enjoy doing everything by ourself, or can’t find a helper, a wooden board to brace the frame open and a thick pillow to protect the cowl and keep the frame from falling onto the cowl will help. Remove most of the screws, leaving the middle one in, unscrewed most of the way, then when all but the middle screw is out, position yourself next to the owl and hold the frame while you remove the middle screw the rest of the way. Jim Patrick

Note. My screws were badly rusted, so I had to spray the nuts through the header holes with “Blaster” for several days to allow me to loosen the nuts. If this is the case with yours, take care not to strip out the screw slot before the nuts can be easily removed.


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by BLB27 » Tue Oct 27, 2020 9:12 pm

I got the windshield removed by siding it out of the hinge. Now other questions. How do I remove the glass? There are two screws in each of the top two corners. If I remove these, will the top frame be released from the two side pieces ? What can be done to "free" the glass from the frames?


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by jiminbartow » Wed Oct 28, 2020 1:32 am

Yes. In addition to the countersunk oval headed machine screws (a total of 2) at the top front corners of the frame, there are two countersunk flat headed slot head machine screws (a total of 4) on the right and left side of the frame at the top that will allow you to separate the long straight top piece from the lower U-shaped square frame. A long thin blade (perhaps a very thin serrated knife) may be necessary to cut out the gasket on each side of the glass to remove the glass, if you are going to reuse it or try to take it out for the glass cutter to use as a pattern to cut a new windshield from laminated glass. I had the book with all the Ford glass patterns, so I simply broke my windshield out to take the frame apart. When I got the glass cut, the glass was too thick to use the original type gasket, so I installed the windshield by centering the glass in the channel of the frame and, using a black RTV silicone sealer like “Ultra Black” or “The Right Stuff“, sealed around the frame on both sides of the glass. Any overflow of the sealant was removed from each side of the glass with a razor blade. Jim Patrick


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by BLB27 » Wed Oct 28, 2020 1:07 pm

Thanks Jim. A good explanation! Are there any gaskets available that will work with 3/16" thick glass? Are there any solutions that could be used to soak the frame/glass interface to help get the glass out of the channel?


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by jiminbartow » Wed Oct 28, 2020 1:27 pm

The original glass was thinner in width than modern laminated windshield glass, so I don’t think there is a gasket that will allow you to slide the glass in the channel as illustrated. I bought the original type gasket and, in trying to install my new laminated windshield in the frame using a wooden mallet as in the illustration, it would not go in and I was afraid that I would damage the frame, so that is when I decided to use the black RTV silicone. I partially filled the channel with it and imbedded the windshield in it, keeping the glass centered in the channel. The side pieces of the frame can be opened a little to allow the glass to go in easier. Once the glass is seated in the bottom channel, the sides can Pushed back together around the glass. Some of the RTV will squeeze out. Remove as much of the RTV overflow as you can while still uncured. The rest can be removed after it cures with a razor blade.

The original 1927 gaskets that hold your windshield in are 93 years old, are hard and petrified and very difficult to remove. However, It might be possible to carefully pull off the top frame piece to see how the rest of the gaskets are held in. Once the top piece is off, the bottom piece is somewhat flexible and you might be able to carefully separate the sides from the glass by gently forcing a sharpened wedge type dowel Into the channel between the glass and bottom of the channel only enough to break the seal. You must be very careful not to spread it too far. If this is not feasible, then cutting the gasket with the a thin sharp implement is the way to go, unless you want to break the glass. Jim Patrick
Last edited by jiminbartow on Wed Oct 28, 2020 1:45 pm, edited 3 times in total.


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by BLB27 » Wed Oct 28, 2020 1:30 pm

Thanks again, Jim. How did you keep the glass centered in the channel?


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by jiminbartow » Wed Oct 28, 2020 1:59 pm

You can use small wedges on each side of the glass to center it and hold it in place. Once cured, the wedges can be removed and the holes filled with RTV. You will need to do the entire windshield to be sure the top piece will go on once the glass is installed in the lower channel.

Before installing the glass, you might want to lay the frame flat and insert the new laminated glass into the cleaned channel of the frame and temporarily press on the top piece. center the glass in the frame so that there is the same depth of the glass in the frame on all sides. When this result is achieved, take a sharpie marker and trace around the glass so, when you do the job, you will know when the glass is positioned correctly. Jim Patrick


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by Humblej » Wed Oct 28, 2020 3:06 pm

A good glass shop should be able to install the glass into the frame, they use a rubber like tape between the glass and frame. And best thing is if they crack the glass during installation they cut another at no charge to you. You crack the glass you buy another one. (been there, done that).

Ford Service Bulletins have a section on installing glass, worth reading.


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by ModelTWoods » Wed Oct 28, 2020 3:40 pm

Removing the small screws that hold the windshield frame together , can be a real BEACH. At least mine were.


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by jiminbartow » Wed Oct 28, 2020 3:49 pm

The frame is very delicate and can easily be bent, twisted or broken, if great care is not taken. With all due respect, I wouldn’t trust someone who has only ever worked on modern, well made parts and never worked on a Model T part, or had no knowledge on how much force can be used on a 93 year old part. The glass cutter may be willing to replace the glass if he breaks it, but what will happen if he damages or destroys a very hard to find 1927 windshield frame.

RTV is easier to use to install the glass in the frame without dangerous stresses being applied to the frame, however, the fact remains that there are a lot of 1926-‘27 improved style Model T coupes and tudors with this type of windshield frame in which new laminated windshields have been installed by the owners in a method different than my RTV method. I only described the way I installed mine and the reason I did it that way when I did mine in 1970. It is possible that since 1970, thinner laminated glass has become available as well as thinner, easier to apply gaskets to install the glass the original way. If this is the case, you might want to do some research into this and try to do it the original way with strips of cork or fiber gaskets and a mallet. If it works, it will certainly be much less messy than using RTV, but no more waterproof.

My windshield has not leaked in 50 years and, unlike gasket strips, the RTV has prevented water from getting around the end of the gasket strips in the corners and down into the frame channel and rusting it. If I had to do it all again, even if new materials were available that would enable me to install the windshield in the frame the original way, I would still use a silicone RTV as I did in 1970 to install the windshield (“The Right Stuff” was not available back in 1970, but it is what I would use today). Jim Patrick
Last edited by jiminbartow on Wed Oct 28, 2020 4:00 pm, edited 6 times in total.


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by jiminbartow » Wed Oct 28, 2020 3:54 pm

I agree a Terry. I had to soak mine with Blaster for several days and then use a very large screwdriver with a blade the same length and width of the slot in order to get a good bite. The screwdriver blade must go all the way to the bottom of the slot, even if it needs to be filed thinner to allow for this. Great care must be taken and great pressure applied not to allow the blade to slip and damage the slot. It might help to tap the end screwdriver when it is in the slot. Tapping it might break loose enough rust particles to loosen the threads, in the same way that tapping on a tight jar lid allows you to unscrew the lid by breaking loose particles that are causing the lid to stick. Jim Patrick


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by BLB27 » Wed Oct 28, 2020 5:28 pm

Has anyone used liquids to soak the old gaskets to help get the glass out of channels?


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by jiminbartow » Wed Oct 28, 2020 11:33 pm

I doubt it. Gaskets are there to make the windshield liquid proof. If you still want to save the old windshield by removing the gaskets, you’ll need to cut the old gaskets out with a thin blade. Jim Patrick


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by BLB27 » Fri Oct 30, 2020 7:02 pm

I was successful in getting the frame apart and the glass out of channels!!!! I soaked the channels in Kroil and then used dental picks to remove the gaskets. Thanks to everyone who responded. The Forum is great!


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by BLB27 » Fri Oct 30, 2020 8:48 pm

The piece that holds the wiper to the top frame is broken. Is there way to replace it?


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by jiminbartow » Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:16 pm

Great job. Post some pictures of the disassembled frame showing the attaching brackets that insert into the frame along with the screws so, in the future, if someone looks up this thread, they will find pictures showing how the frame is put together that will make it more clear as to how to get it apart. If you have any of the gasket left, you, might want to take a picture of the glass with the strip gasket in place on the edge of the glass. Jim Patrick


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by jiminbartow » Fri Oct 30, 2020 9:25 pm

The only thing that holds the windshield wiper to the frame is a steel tube that the wiper shaft goes through and is secured by a nut on the interior side of the frame. Is your tube missing? All you need is a tube the length of the wiper shaft, with and ID that the shaft will fit. The tube can be secured through the frame by brazing, soldering or with Aluminum Devcon putty. The longer part of the tube should be on the interior side with the outside of the tube flush with the face of the windshield. Jim Patrick


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by BLB27 » Fri Oct 30, 2020 11:13 pm

Jim, Yes, I agree it would be good to post pictures, but I am still having difficulty learning how to post pics.


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Re: 1927 Coupe Windshield Question

Post by Billdizer,Spencer In » Sat Oct 31, 2020 6:40 am

There is a urethane windshield sealer/bedding compound available in a standard caulking tube. It is made to install modern windshields in their frames. It is a very strong adhesive when dry. It forms a rubber like seal, but is not slick like silicone sealer. I buy it at my local NAPA, so most auto parts stores should have it, or be able to get it. It will seal a piece of glass in and will not leak. It can also be used to glue the window riser track to the bottom of your side windows. I have used it to attach weather stripping, but it will need to be taped or otherwise held in place while it dries. Just another option to look at!

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