Duster, Car coat

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Rob Patterson
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Duster, Car coat

Post by Rob Patterson » Fri Sep 20, 2019 7:49 pm

Do any of the vendors sell Dusters / Car coats?
If so, I'm keen to hear you recommendations, please?
Thanks & Cheers,
Rob
"When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it." HENRY FORD

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JTT3
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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by JTT3 » Fri Sep 20, 2019 9:30 pm

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Driving Dusters

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Rob Patterson
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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by Rob Patterson » Fri Sep 20, 2019 10:52 pm

"Thanks" John,
That, I believe, makes it two that I owe you.
Cheers,
Rob
"When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it." HENRY FORD

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Steve Jelf
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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by Steve Jelf » Fri Sep 20, 2019 10:58 pm

If you Google duster and shop coat you'll get several choices in each category. The dusters will generally cost more. Unfortunately, brown and tan, which I prefer, seem to be very much out of style. At one time Sportsman's Guide was selling Czech military surplus shop coats in a package of three for $27, but I think they sold out of those and there are no more. If anybody is still selling coats with Ford markings (they weren't the last time I checked), they will be expensive. My solution to that was to download the image I wanted from the internet and have an embroidery shop make patches for $10 each.

IMG_2726 copy.JPG
The inevitable often happens.
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Rob Patterson
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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by Rob Patterson » Fri Sep 20, 2019 11:21 pm

Thanks Steve,

I asked about this because ever since getting our first T on the road in 2004, my wife and I have always wanted one each. Now we have the Speedster finished, without a windscreen, they've become a necessity.

We have just returned from the Goodwood Revival in the UK and saw many dusters for sale there, but with asking prices in the 990 pounds to 1,390 pounds (US$ 1,235- US$1,735) area, we just shook our heads realised that the vendors had a captive audience (hence the stupidly high prices) and I knew I'd seen much better prices somewhere on this forum, years ago. I will admit that the more expensive one of these two was leather and double breasted.

Anyway, thanks to John's link, I've just ordered a Chocolate Twill duster for my wife and a classic cotton duster for myself. For both, including postage to me here in the antipodes, all up, has just cost me US$210. BARGAIN.

Cheers,
Rob
"When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it." HENRY FORD

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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by Steve Jelf » Fri Sep 20, 2019 11:56 pm

Wow! a £1390 duster must be for gold dust. :D
The inevitable often happens.
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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by Rob Patterson » Sat Sep 21, 2019 12:04 am

Yes, that is no exaggeration Steve.
I was so shocked by the asking price I took photos.......
My apologies for the cock-eyed images. I don't know how to straighten them up. Sorry.
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"When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it." HENRY FORD

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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by Steve Jelf » Sat Sep 21, 2019 12:50 am

I had the same problem of pictures showing up sideways. It only happens with vertical shots. I found that if I rotate them 90º left or right and then back 90º to vertical they post correctly.




file-5.jpg


file-6.jpg
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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by Loftfield » Sat Sep 21, 2019 6:37 am

You can buy repros, or you can go for originals. We have now bought four original linen dusters (two for us, two for passengers) at not much more than the repros cost (sometimes less). Try eBay and Etsy for originals, but you do have to look as prices vary widely. Since you have an "original" car, not a repro, why not go for original accessories as well? I find that far too many antique car people are all about the cars, as if they existed in a "gearhead" vacuum historically, rather than engaging in living history, i.e. putting the antique car into as original a setting (and use) as possible. When we go out in our antique autos we wear not only dusters, but a lot of original, and period-correct repro, clothing as well. In addition to correct hats, gauntlets, and goggles, our collection includes dresses, blouses, pants, shirts, shoes, etc. For certain shows we also carry an antique portable Victrola and picnic gear. OK, maybe a bit overboard, but we do get many positive comments from onlookers.I find it sad, really, that there is still not one single entry on the forum for period clothing.

Tom Loftfield
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modeltspeedster
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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by modeltspeedster » Sat Sep 21, 2019 7:13 am

Try this link. Their prices seem more reasonable and they have a whole lot of other accessories.
https://www.historicalemporium.com/search/?q=duster

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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by Jugster » Sat Sep 21, 2019 11:43 pm

backslide h jpeg.jpg

Getting the right Horseless Carriage apparel can be a challenge. The most difficult part is the hat. For that, there are a number of options depending on whether you only want to use the hat for piloting your Brass-Era car or would like to use it in everyday life. For dedicated Edwardian motoring, you might want to go with a "Marlin Brando" motorcycle cap, like the one he wore in the movie, "The Wild One." You can find that here:

http://www.villagehatshop.com/product/a ... s-cap.html

My personal favorite is the Greek Fisherman's Cap. It comes in a variety of colors (I picked white), looks authentic and can be worn anytime you like. You can get a good-quality cheapie here:

https://www.amazon.com/Summer-Cotton-Fi ... 2Bhat&th=1

... or you can get a really high-quality version here:

http://www.villagehatshop.com/searchx/g ... b%3aretail

Choosing, finding and purchasing the right pair of goggles is a bigger pain in the neck than might be expected. _Going into the endeavor, you need to ask yourself a number of questions for the purpose of categorizing what it is you're actually after.

Are these goggles just for show?

I recently bought a pair of fabulously cheap goggles as a hat decoration. _Not intended to be functional as eye protection, they serve the function of a costume accessory. _Back in the days of early airplanes and automobiles, goggles came in a few different shapes, but generally conformed to the 2-cup configuration. _Circular was one of the available cup-shapes, so these costume goggles fit the bill. https://www.adafruit.com/product/1577

... and:

https://www.tmart.com/Vintage-Victorian ... gJFYPD_BwE


Do you wear corrective lenses?

If you wear contacts, that simplifies your choices considerably, but if you wear eyeglasses, form is definitely going to follow function and you need something that can be worn over a pair of glasses. _That usually involves a compromise with historical correctness because most of these don't have two-cups, but a single expanse of transparency across both eyes and that's about as wrong looking as you can get. _Not all goggles advertised as being the type that can be worn over eyeglasses can actually do that. _This depends mostly on the size and shape of your eyeglasses, which means buying them online becomes an iffy proposition. _You really need to try them on before committing to a purchase. _That's less of a consideration if the supplier has a dependably liberal return policy. _If you don't mind spending the money, you can have an optician grind you up a set of prescription lenses and fit them to your 2-cup goggles (assuming the lenses are replaceable). _The problem with that arrangement is you'll have to first remove your eyeglasses before pulling prescription goggles down over your eyes. _Here's a source for prescription goggles:

https://www.goodglasses.com/Prescriptio ... p_373.html

And here are some examples of "over eyeglasses" goggles:

http://www.maximumeyewear.com/productfo ... 4qxftKWyDY


Does cost matter?

If you're ridiculously wealthy, you can have your butler go out and find you a suitable set of goggles and keep sending him back till he gets it right. _For the rest of us, bucks matter. _Because my Model T isn't a speedster and has a functional windshield, I only need goggles in the infrequent event I get caught in the rain. _So far, that has only happened once, but when it did, I was a fair distance from home and it was really coming down. _Besides putting the top up, that also meant folding the windshield down and strapping on goggles. _Now, when it comes to a car that doesn't do much over 30 mph, there isn't a whole lot of stress and strain on a pair of goggles and in my case, a pair of cheap, non-fogging carpenter's goggles filled the bill just fine. _You can buy a set here for a ridiculously small price and oddly enough, a few of them a actually have a nice "historical" appearance:

https://www.constructiongear.com/pyrame ... ggles.html

Ski goggles work well, too, but as they're in more or less the same price range as motorcycle goggles, you may as well get the type made for the road.


How historically correct to you need your goggles to be?

You can spend some fairly big bucks on actual 100-year-old goggles that may or may not be safe to use while driving, or you can go with a recently manufactured product that approximates their appearance. _Your call. _The real stuff is easy enough to find on e-bay:

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R4 ... s&_sacat=0

Dusters can be purchased here:

http://www.riverjunction.com/Dusters-_c_84.html

... or here:

https://www.gentlemansemporium.com/stor ... p?eesc=cat

And here are some sources for driving gauntlets:

http://www.wildcowboy.com/Deerskin-leat ... untlet.htm

... and:

https://www.wildcowboy.com/Gloves_c364.htm

... and:

http://www.leatherglovesonline.com/np/M ... tion=start

And that oughta do it!

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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by DLodge » Sun Sep 22, 2019 8:56 am

Loftfield wrote:
Sat Sep 21, 2019 6:37 am
When we go out in our antique autos we wear not only dusters, but a lot of original, and period-correct repro, clothing as well. In addition to correct hats, gauntlets, and goggles, our collection includes dresses, blouses, pants, shirts, shoes, etc. For certain shows we also carry an antique portable Victrola and picnic gear. OK, maybe a bit overboard, but we do get many positive comments from onlookers.I find it sad, really, that there is still not one single entry on the forum for period clothing.
Tom, In principle, you're right. Unfortunately cloth doesn't wear as well or last as long as steel (try not to be overwhelmed by the depth of my insights), so accurate repros are sometimes easier and pretty much work as well visually.

(I also have an antique portable Victrola, although after my last move I'm not sure where it is. When I saw it in an antique store with a tag that said it was from 1924, I knew it was meant to accompany my car.)


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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by Rich Bingham » Sun Sep 22, 2019 8:35 pm

There is a difference between a duster (floor length) and a shop coat (knee length). They were universally buff or light tan (dust colored) for obvious reasons, and were in general use thirty years or more before the advent of the infernal gas buggy. I think efforts at period dress really complement the hobby. Kudos to all who go out of their way to "match" their Model Ts !
:D
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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by Kaiser » Mon Sep 23, 2019 6:35 am

Look up 'Driza-bone' i have been using their 'rider coat' for a couple of decades now, on bikes as well as on open cars.
It is absolutely water proof ( with a little care) and can be rolled up into a small package that will fit anywhere in your car, so you're never without it when the weather changes, as it often does in the Netherlands.
It has the right period look and absolutely does what it has to do i.e. keep you dry and/or free of dirt and grime.
They aren't cheap but worth every cent.
(that's not me in the picture, i'm way past that :D
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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by DLodge » Mon Sep 23, 2019 8:02 am

Kaiser wrote:
Mon Sep 23, 2019 6:35 am
... when the weather changes, as it often does in the Netherlands.
Yes, it does. It changes from light rain to heavy rain to moderate rain to light rain and then back to heavy rain. When I lived in NL, there were days that I would wake up and think, "If I look out the window and it's raining again today, I am going to kill someone." :D


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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by Allan » Mon Sep 23, 2019 9:05 am

Leo, your Driza-bone is an Australian icon. It is an oilskin coat used by many outside workers in the agricultural and pastoral industries. Without the oil applied, it has moved into country fashion wear. There are other brands, but Driza-bone has become the standard description just as a hoover is a vacuum cleaner.

Allan from down under.


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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by Rich Bingham » Mon Sep 23, 2019 10:55 am

Driza-bone is in the class of outer wear with cowboy slickers. Stateside you can probably find knock-offs less spendy than the Aussie original. Check your local saddle shop or western wear stores. Since "The Man From Snowy River" oilskins became real popular. I'm hopelessly out of fashion. I have a bright yellow rubberized "Uniroyal" slicker I've packed on my saddle-bow for forty years. The only time I needed it, I left it in the trailer. It don't rain much out here. :roll:

Thing is, they are not dusters, they're rainwear. The cut is "wrong" with those shoulder wings. Many slickers have a full shoulder cape. If early motoring authenticity is your goal, they're "close " but no cee-gar. That said, they are probably far more useful, especially for guys in topless speedsters !
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Re: Duster, Car coat

Post by DHort » Mon Sep 23, 2019 11:01 am

My speedster is topless, and she is a she!

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