New member, can you identify this Hack?

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130nav
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New member, can you identify this Hack?

Post by 130nav » Fri Dec 13, 2019 10:13 pm

Hello,

New member here from Columbus Ohio. I recently came upon an opportunity to own one of two 1925 model T's. The cost is the same for me, one is a Depot Hack that appears to have started life as a tudor or fordor and hasn't run for 2 years or so. The other is a touring car that I do not have any pictures of yet, but it should be in relatively decent condition but it hasn't run for "several" years, and is currently stored on blocks in a shipping container. All things being equal I think I would prefer the touring car, but I need to find out more about it and its condition. In the meantime, can anyone tell me anything about the hack pictured below (none of the other cars pictured are for sale unfortunately) Thanks in advance.

- Matt
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Scott_Conger
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Re: New member, can you identify this Hack?

Post by Scott_Conger » Fri Dec 13, 2019 10:29 pm

That hack looks like the steering wheel would be up under your chin and be very uncomfortable to drive. At their best, original hacks were typically far less comfortable than their factory cousins. The dimensions on this one's seating arrangement just appear odd.

If they both cost the same, the touring would be a far better use of $$ if it in any kind of shape at all.

Whatever you decide, buy T-1 factory manual from one of the suppliers and pay special attention to how to remove the starter. One day you will feel compelled to remove it and it is not as straight-forward as it seems and serious, $$$ damage can be induced by doing it wrong.

The most expensive T you can buy, in the best running condition, will in the long run be the cheapest.

Good luck and have fun.
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Steve Jelf
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Re: New member, can you identify this Hack?

Post by Steve Jelf » Fri Dec 13, 2019 10:40 pm

Ford did not produce a hack as such. Ford sold the chassis, and it was up to the buyer to make or purchase an aftermarket hack body. Hacks were a tiny percentage, I would guess less than 1%, of the Fords produced. Most of the ones you see today are modern creations like yours. Some are very carefully made with authentic period designs, parts, and methods. Some are embarrassingly slapdash with no attempt at authenticity. And many are somewhere in between. From what I can see of this one, it appears to be in that middle group, with some modern construction but well executed. What piques my curiosity is the odd pedals.
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Philip Lawrence
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Re: New member, can you identify this Hack?

Post by Philip Lawrence » Fri Dec 13, 2019 11:22 pm

If the touring car has good sheet metal and a solid body I would go for it. Most anybody can do basic mechanical repairs and farm out engine work but to get a dented, warped and loose body correctly restored is beyond the ability of most model T owners and could cost much more than an engine overhaul to make it right by a professional.

It all depends on how much you are able to do yourself. As far as that hack goes, from what I can see it would never be worth what a stock bodied car of the same vintage would be. That's not necessarily true for all Depot Hacks. Depot Hack is a modern term by the way. Originally that body style (built by after market coach building firms and not by Ford) was referred to as a Suburban body.

As mentioned earlier buy the best car you can find. Shop for quality and not price. Look for a car that you can drive or go for a test drive in and take a knowledgeable model T owner with you to look at the car. In the long run you will be be far happier as a first time model T owner. Even If you have to spend more than you want on your first T it will not be money wasted. With a few years experience with T's you can look for project cars. Just keep in mind that any car you look at that needs work to get running WILL in the long run cost far more than that nicely restored one.

I speak with over 50 years of experience in this hobby. You are of course always free to do whatever you like. Wishing you the best on your journey, have a safe and happy holiday season!
Last edited by Philip Lawrence on Sun Dec 15, 2019 12:26 am, edited 2 times in total.


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Re: New member, can you identify this Hack?

Post by Adam » Sat Dec 14, 2019 12:53 pm

The hack is mostly plywood and not something too appropriate to the chassis it is on. If you like it, think you’ll have more fun in it than the touring, are not concerned with resale value or historical accuracy, then go for it. If the touring is in good shape physically and mechanically, and is a complete, historically accurate car, then the touring is probably a much better value.

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Mark Gregush
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Re: New member, can you identify this Hack?

Post by Mark Gregush » Sat Dec 14, 2019 1:24 pm

While this may seem as a rude question, what $ amounts are we talking about here? Have you done your homework on current prices? What work has been done on both cars? Do they come with paper work to transfer ownership? When you post more photos and add the touring, post some photos of the underside and engine etc of both. Lots of these cars look really nice on the out side but underneath not so much. While the hacks sheet metal looks nice, I am not impressed with the construction of the body. Yes mine has 5/8 plywood sides but also cross brace and lath type roof and has held up for 1000's of miles and all kinds of roads. The sides and plywood top on this one don't look all that strong. For an occasional trip, parade or to get ice cream might be ok, but I would not want to put a lot of miles with that front seat and angle of the steering wheel.
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Re: New member, can you identify this Hack?

Post by John kuehn » Sat Dec 14, 2019 1:38 pm

Whatever you do make sure you get a good clear title! And again make sure the title is signed by the person you are buying the car from! If he has a title again make sure the title transfer was paid by the seller and it’s not an “open title”. More than a few old cars have been bought with “supposedly good titles” with the buyer to later find out it’s not totally correct.
If the title is not clear it should be at least 500.00 off the selling price to have to go through the time and hassle trying to get it straightened out. Not trying to scare you but you should find out for sure before you buy it.
Good luck and hope everything works out OK.


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Re: New member, can you identify this Hack?

Post by Sarikatime » Sat Dec 14, 2019 1:58 pm

That hack has some really nice seats, but, comfort you will have to judge for yourself. The clutch pedal looks like it was cut and the brake pedal has a piece added to help with large feet. The top without any sideway bracing will get blown over in a strong wind or at a nice speed while you are driving. The windshield posts will hold the front but the back will fishtail only at best and you know the worst. If you buy it, brace up the posts with 45 degree bracing side to side, shake it really hard, and if it still moves front to back as well. Also look on this websites home page and find a club nearest you, call and find a friend to look at the car before you buy. Just my opinion. Frank


Sarikatime
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Re: New member, can you identify this Hack?

Post by Sarikatime » Sat Dec 14, 2019 2:07 pm

As an afterthought, I would buy the touring, if it is in good condition faster than the hack, but, my personal preference would be the roadster next to the hack. Best of luck and welcome to the affliction. Frank


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130nav
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Re: New member, can you identify this Hack?

Post by 130nav » Mon Dec 16, 2019 10:59 am

Thank you all for the advice. After talking to the owner, it looks like I'm not getting pictures of the touring car anytime soon because of its location, but I think I will going for the touring car. He says it should be in about the same mechanical condition, but that I will have to come check it out for my self. It seems to make the most sense as more than just a parade/low speed vehicle. I know the doors in a touring car probably arn't much more secure that the fabric ones on my old jeep, but with kids in the car I'd prefer them to nothing. He also said the top of the touring car might not be in the best shape, but i feel like I should worry more about making sure the body and mechanicals are solid. I still have about 6 months until I can pick either up, so plenty of time to do some research and make a trip out to see both cars ( they are located in KS.)


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Re: New member, can you identify this Hack?

Post by FrankHarris » Tue Dec 17, 2019 8:00 pm

Just remember that a well built ugly car will remain around for a long time to offend but that beauty is in the eye of the beholder said she as she kissed the cow. (that's an old saying from my mother in law)..


Humblej
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Re: New member, can you identify this Hack?

Post by Humblej » Tue Dec 17, 2019 9:35 pm

Agree, pass on the hack!

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