Advice needed

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Jonah D'Avella
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Advice needed

Post by Jonah D'Avella » Sat Oct 17, 2020 10:05 am

How do I remove the bushings on the front steering spindles?
F: first F: find
O: on O: oil
R: race R: revive
D: day D: drive


Humblej
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Re: Advice needed

Post by Humblej » Sat Oct 17, 2020 10:12 am

The bushings are hat shaped so you cannot press them thru. One way is to cut the outside part of the bushing off, then press them thru. Another way is to screw a tap into the bushing and drive the bushing out from the back side with a punch against the tap. There are special tools but pricy and not readily available.

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TWrenn
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Re: Advice needed

Post by TWrenn » Sat Oct 17, 2020 10:15 am

I've been lucky in the past except once. I would spritz anti-seize spray on both ends, wait, spray some more, after a while setting
then I was able to get enough "bite" on the hat with a cold chisel and pound away and they would slide up enough to where I could get a pipe wrench on them and twist them out. But once I had to take 'em to my favorite machine shop. They were just in there too tight.

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DanTreace
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Re: Advice needed

Post by DanTreace » Sat Oct 17, 2020 10:18 am

Using a tap is quick and efficient.
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Or in lieu of the tap, vendors sell a split driver that catches on the barrel of the bushing to drive it out.
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Split driver on lower part of photo
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Re: Advice needed

Post by Steve Jelf » Sat Oct 17, 2020 11:54 am

IMG_5604 copy.JPG
I get by with just a 3/8" rod and a Big Fat Hammer.
The inevitable often happens.
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John iaccino
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Re: Advice needed

Post by John iaccino » Sat Oct 17, 2020 2:08 pm

Jonah, if you send me the spindles and new king pins, I will rebuild the spindles for you and ream the bushings for free. John

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Welcome to Bushing World, was Advice needed

Post by ivaldes1 » Sat Oct 17, 2020 2:24 pm

Jonah! Welcome to bushing world. There are 20 total bushings on the front and rear running gear. If they are worn out they should be replaced. It makes a big difference in how your T drives and handles. Lang's sells a variety of bushing drivers that are worth getting. It is time-consuming to do the job without them. I have many of them and can lend them to you.
Jonah D'Avella wrote:
Sat Oct 17, 2020 10:05 am
How do I remove the bushings on the front steering spindles?


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Jonah D'Avella
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Re: Advice needed

Post by Jonah D'Avella » Sat Oct 17, 2020 2:48 pm

What exactly is reaming?
F: first F: find
O: on O: oil
R: race R: revive
D: day D: drive


Dan Hatch
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Re: Advice needed

Post by Dan Hatch » Sat Oct 17, 2020 2:59 pm

You also need to check the top of the front axle yoke and the threads in the bottom of yoke on front axle.
Google “ Stevens Front Axle Tool video “ on you tube.
Good luck. Dan


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Re: Advice needed

Post by Dan Hatch » Sat Oct 17, 2020 3:04 pm

Also look at page 166 Ford service manual.
image.jpg

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John iaccino
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Re: Advice needed

Post by John iaccino » Sat Oct 17, 2020 3:17 pm

What exactly is reaming?
Jonah, the king pins are 1/2" in diameter. The holes in the bushings need to be made a few thousandths larger than the king pins to be able to rotate inside the bushings and still have clearance for oil. A ream enlarges the hole in the bushings to allow for the clearance.

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Re: Advice needed

Post by CudaMan » Sat Oct 17, 2020 5:03 pm

The reamer that the vendors sell is a line reamer, it ensures that the two bushings are reamed exactly parallel to each other so that the spindle bolt has a tight fit yet can turn easily. If you remove one old bushing at a time you can use the remaining old bushing to align the reamer for the first new bushing, then remove the remaining old bushing and use the reamed new bushing to align the reamer for the second new bushing. If you remove both old bushings before installing the new ones, then the vendors sell a guide that fits in one of the spindle holes to align the reamer so that you can ream the first new bushing.

The special tools for this job aren't cheap, and you won't use them often if you only have one Model T, so hopefully you can hook up with a local club or Model T friend that can lend you the tools. :)

https://www.modeltford.com/item/2713RM.aspx

https://www.modeltford.com/item/2713RMT.aspx

The vendors sell a split tool that can also be used to drive the old bushings out. You squeeze the sprung ends together to insert the tool, then the tool expands to bear against the bushing flange so that the bushing can be driven out. A good trick with this tool is to use a flat blade screwdriver to keep the tool ends spread apart while you are driving out the bushing.

https://www.modeltford.com/item/2713SPL.aspx
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Re: Advice needed

Post by NealW » Sat Oct 17, 2020 5:58 pm

A good trick with this tool is to use a flat blade screwdriver to keep the tool ends spread apart while you are driving out the bushing.
Not only is this a good trick, but about the only way to keep the tool spread apart to drive out the bushing. Stick the screwdiver into the tool like shown in the picture below, and one or two whacks on the garage floor will pop the bushings out.

I also agree with the comments earlier about getting the right reamer tools. I think that this is one of those cases where you really need the specialty tools, or don't do it at all, because you may end up being worse off than when you started.
spindle bushing removal.jpg

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Re: Advice needed

Post by CudaMan » Sat Oct 17, 2020 6:01 pm

Jonah, unless you have money to burn on tools, I would sure take up John Iaccino on his offer to do your spindles and steering arms for free if you send them to him. :)
Mark Strange
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Henry K. Lee
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Re: Advice needed

Post by Henry K. Lee » Sat Oct 17, 2020 6:25 pm

Jonah,

Always read up on a task to be done prior to performing it. As young as you are, we are out there to assist but you need to read up as this will only make you better and better.

All the Best,

Hank


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Re: Advice needed

Post by DHort » Sat Oct 17, 2020 6:35 pm

Dan Treace and Henry Lee will always give you great advice.

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John Warren
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Re: Advice needed

Post by John Warren » Sun Oct 18, 2020 11:15 am

One thing that is important is when you take the spindles off, the spindle bolt is threaded into the axle with a lock nut on the bottom. Be sure to unscrew and not try to pound out the bolt. Like said just use a tap and thread it, works great. Your questions are always welcome. jw
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Re: Advice needed

Post by jiminbartow » Sun Oct 18, 2020 1:32 pm

I notice that you are asking questions that can all be found through researching available period literature. We don’t mind answering questions, but many of your questions are much too complicated for a simple answer and require detailed explanations of procedures in which an important step or steps could be left out.

When I first bought my Model T in 1970, when I was 16, I spent more time reading up on my Model T and learning about repair procedures and researching the various upcoming tasks I had to do on my Model T, than I did on my schoolwork. Unlike you, I had no internet or Forum experts to advise me. Reading about it made it much more clear and concise and not only told me how to do something, but why, while informing me of the precautions necessary to do the work safely. Though the information was from the days of the Model T, it came, first hand, accompanied by detailed pictures and diagrams, from the Ford Model T experts and engineers at Ford who designed the Model T and the procedures necessary for doing the repairs safely, properly and correctly.

Once again...you need to get some reading material and research these questions for yourself. If after doing the research, you have questions, please ask away. There are no shortcuts in the acquisition of knowledge and learning the right and safe way to work on your T. The three publications that helped me the most can be seen in the photos below. I strongly recommend that you get them and start studying, for to embark on some of the jobs you are doing, without the necessary knowledge and precauctions, that can only be learned through research, you can easily injure or kill yourself or others, if your incorrect or incomplete repairs fail while on the roads driving. One shocking example of this was your temporary fuel tank set up you put together out of a small red plastic funnel, plastic tubing and tape. This could have gone so wrong in so many ways and really caused me to worry about you and the chances you are willing to take without the knowledge and experience, necessary to imagine and deal with the possible consequences, should things go wrong. This hobby is fun, but it is no game and must be taken seriously. Please be informed and be careful. Jim Patrick

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Re: Advice needed

Post by Steve Jelf » Sun Oct 18, 2020 4:08 pm

Jim is correct. It's best to read about the best practices and procedures from experts, then ask questions if something they tell you needs explanation. Consulting a good reference can save you the time of waiting for an answer, and sometimes gives you a better answer. Of course there are different kinds of questions. For the How to...? questions, you want the Service Manual and the MTFCA books, and online sources like the videos by Mike Bender, Mitch Taylor, and others. For questions on Model T History, what's correct, what year, etc., the first place I look is the Model T Encyclopedia. Other helpful references there are the MTFCI guidelines and the Rodda books. More info is here: http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG80.html

I intend to update that page with some additional references.

I'm not going to tell you to "do your homework" because asking questions on the forum is part of your homework. It's just more efficient to be able to find a lot of the information from your own library, whether it's hard copy or online, then ask here if you need to.

Of course the forum is great for other things too, like sharing what you've been up to, where you've been, some interesting thing you've found, etc., etc. (All with pictures of course. It's usually better with pictures.) :D
The inevitable often happens.
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