Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

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Matt in California
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Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Sat Aug 31, 2019 1:23 pm

I picked this just in time for wood cutting season!
8C24AEF1-0137-478C-A6B1-DE150FAABF9F.jpeg
9627E6DF-6097-4056-86C1-94774F652F25.jpeg
EE02F769-D31C-4CBA-9406-B99E01FC5438.jpeg
I like the throttle and timing leaver.
ABF1BE96-A71D-4EE7-9D40-0875098F052F.jpeg
Year of engine.
A6E11033-FF72-4C11-A8AC-55C183E2AC1A.jpeg
So this is a brass era engine?

Matt


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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Dallas Landers » Sat Aug 31, 2019 1:27 pm

Very nice Matt! I cant seem to find anything like that around here.

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Sat Aug 31, 2019 1:36 pm

Dallas Landers wrote:
Sat Aug 31, 2019 1:27 pm
Very nice Matt! I cant seem to find anything like that around here.
Dallas.
Your winter will be colder than mine, so you need to find one!

I got this from someone who had purchased a house but the occupant was a model T & A enthusiast and was hoarding a large amount of parts. He refused to move until he sold everything. So the buyer had to pay additional money to buy the pile of stuff.

Matt


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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Dallas Landers » Sat Aug 31, 2019 2:01 pm

Sounds like a good plan! Im going to tell my wife that our house is worth more because of my T parts! Hope to increase the value monday at the sale. :D


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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by DHort » Sat Aug 31, 2019 2:29 pm

I am sure OSHA will give you the green light on that saw.


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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Wayne Sheldon » Sat Aug 31, 2019 3:17 pm

NEAT SAW !
I would be torn between wanting to keep that as close to "as was", or to rework it with a common later engine so the motor could be used in an HCCA qualifying car.
A November second casting may or may not be a pre-January build engine, but most likely is and most likely would qualify for HCCA. Since the brass Ts were manufactured well into summer of '16, it would almost definitely been a brass T originally.

Since I do so admire original stuff, I think I would keep it "as was".
Find a radiator that cools, and get it working again!
Thank you Matt for sharing this find with us.


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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Les Schubert » Sat Aug 31, 2019 3:33 pm

I would suggest a governor would be a real asset

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Sat Aug 31, 2019 4:20 pm

David, Yeah I am sure that OSHA would be excited to see this! They may have concerns that the belt is exposed, but besides that it should pass with flying colors! Especially when it works as intended cutting off limbs.

Wayne, Thanks for the details. I am leaning towards slowly collecting parts that go along with the era of the engine... But first getting the engine running. Then eventually I could have my first brass era T. I could always use this as an engine testing stand. I like the throttle/spark adjustments.

Les, I can't believe that you want to get political here on the forum! I am sure that we have laws in California about suggesting putting the governor on the engine. I have a request that no one else post any political responses. I don't want this thread pulled of the forum!

Matt
Last edited by Matt in California on Tue Jul 21, 2020 1:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.


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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by bud delong » Sat Aug 31, 2019 6:17 pm

I might be going blind but i see no table on that saw?? You should check the iron pile where you bought the saw.Bud.


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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Shemp » Sat Aug 31, 2019 7:05 pm

I agree I see no table definently would check the scrap pile that came from. Neat unit, thanks for sharing! This is what the girls and I use every year - only a 6hp and one cylinder but it eats the wood. Think it would be a smoother process with that T engine. I hope you get to try it out at least once.

PS - the engine is a 1919 Sandwich built in Sandwich Illionis.
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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by richc » Sat Aug 31, 2019 7:16 pm

It looks like the transmission hogshead is aluminum. During early 1916 a few aluminum transmission covers were used alongside the newly introduced cast iron covers. These 1916 aluminum covers were more like the 1911-12 style covers in that did not have the reinforcing gussets at the bolts holes.
Aluminum Trans Cover.JPG
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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Burger in Spokane » Sat Aug 31, 2019 7:51 pm

I would dearly love to have an operational example like this to go cut wood with the TT.

26 731 2016 aug 01 copy (1).jpg
More people are doing it today than ever before !

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Sat Aug 31, 2019 9:02 pm

bud delong wrote:
Sat Aug 31, 2019 6:17 pm
I might be going blind but i see no table on that saw?? You should check the iron pile where you bought the saw.Bud.
Bud, You are correct. This would be very difficult to use without a table. When I return I will see if the table is there, but it seems clear it was removed long ago. I happened to have the saw blade that I put on there... I bought it without know what it would drive.

Randy, I love your saw! I can't imagine using these buzz saws. I noticed with this one they have it so the pulley ratio is such that the blade is about twice the speed of the engine. And as you said 22 hp would be more than powerful enough to run under full torque. What RPM do you run yours at?

Rich, please enlighten me on how to find if I have the reinforcing gusset.

Thanks,

Matt

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Sat Aug 31, 2019 9:07 pm

I opened the inspection covers in the valves look very nice:
9E71C12A-4B9F-4415-9382-36D58DAE86E2.jpeg
91955BDD-0A34-4934-9100-AC4F412470D0.jpeg
I’m guessing that this is probably set for 40+ years.

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Original Smith » Sat Aug 31, 2019 9:21 pm

Is this 1916 aluminum hogs head information available at the archives? It makes no sense to me!

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Sun Sep 01, 2019 12:08 am

Here is the inside of the transmission:
87947668-A342-4ACB-A919-D6A1C8A5E8B0.jpeg
The inside of the transmission looks very nice as well!

The spark plugs from the inside looked like they were off my rebuilt engine. The top side the threads were rusted off in places. Through the spark hole things looked very nice.
9E28BD15-5117-4737-9B06-A7C21BB6E9D1.jpeg
Looking good so far!

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Angmar » Sun Sep 01, 2019 1:59 pm

Very nice engine/saw unit. Be careful and please post photos and videos when it is operational.
Still crankin old iron

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by perry kete » Sun Sep 01, 2019 2:23 pm

Be careful around villains with that saw !
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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by bud delong » Sun Sep 01, 2019 4:00 pm

I hope you give this thing a long look before you start it! The chain for a front motor mount might not be very good? The way the saw arbor is centered on the engine is also not very good as you will have to angle your wood to get away from the engine and you do not wan't to pinch the saw. In my hop it needs work!Bud.

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Mon Sep 02, 2019 2:38 pm

Perry, Thanks for the warning about villains;)

All, My plan is to just use the stand for testing the engine. The saw requires a belt, so it will not accidentally start turning.

Here is the inside of the crank inspection plate:
2D35E5F4-218A-4406-A024-734F7C8954AE.jpeg
(The fresh oil on the cardboard was not from this engine.) I guess it was a good thing that someone drained the oil in the pan. I think that this confirms that it set for ~40 years. How long does it take for the oil to turn to grease?

Here is what I saw looking in this inspection area:
8C2338BA-AF92-40C1-AC93-571238F5938A.jpeg
Feel free to make your own observations and comments.

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by richc » Mon Sep 02, 2019 7:53 pm

I’m not trying to change the purpose of Matt G’s original post about his great Model T buzz saw – I love it. However, there was some interest regarding the aluminum hogshead on his late 1915 / early 1916 engine assembly. From an earlier post by Hap Tucker in July 2012 we get this mention of 1916 aluminum hogsheads w/o the reinforcement gussets at the corner bolt holes:

“All 1916’s were believed to have had the iron cover. But when Trent Boggess did his research for his article on “Engine Painting” he reviewed photographs of the USA Ford production line. And the photograph of the 1,000,000 milestone engine which was produced at 1:53 ½ on Dec 10, 1915 was also used as one of the reference photos. Because David Dewey’s engine was within 100 numbers of the 1,000,000 he was very interested in when the aluminum transmission cover replaced the cast iron cover. David noted not only did the 1,000,000 photo show an aluminum transmission cover and it was the style “WITHOUT” the reinforcing ribs.

Trent’s response from page 16 of the Sep – Oct 1998 “Vintage Ford” is shown below:

“The transition from the aluminum to the cast iron hogshead took a number of months.
According to the “Record of Change” cards for the transmission cover assembly, the decision to change the material from aluminum to cast iron was made on or about Oct. 5, 1915. By the way, the cards indicate the decision to change to a cast iron timer was made the same day. Other documents at Henry Ford Museum & Greenfield Village (HFMGV) indicate that the decision to change to cast iron was made because of the rising cost of aluminum.

However, it appears that the actual transition to cast iron cases began several months later: A General Letter dated January 1916 told branches and dealers that some production was coming through with cast iron covers. When the car had a cast iron cover; the weight of the car would be 25 pounds more. There is also considerable evidence that aluminum covers continued in use into February 1916 on at least some production. The engine I used in my 1916 had an aluminum cover (#1090523) and I just purchased a chassis for Don Lang with a Feb. 1916 that also has an aluminum transmission cover What’s more, the covers that appear on these cars are what some folks refer to as the ‘11- ‘12 style covers without the reinforcement ridges at the corners. The records at HFMGV do not seem to indicate when these ridges were adopted and so we are left with another mystery that shall never be solved.”

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Duey_C » Mon Sep 02, 2019 8:06 pm

A real clean looking engine inside! That little bugger would be pretty rusty inside, here up in humidity land/northern rust belt. :)
Ya, that wasn't quite the best idea for a buzz saw. I hope you keep it like that just for fun. And hang a belt close by. :)
Nice original Sandwich Randy! Heck, that 6 is more like a hoagie! We've used a factory 6 Economy saw rig a bunch. Good rigs too.
A couple of friends drove down to Iowa a couple weeks ago just to get a good sandwich. Pun intended. :lol:
Pssst, Matt, pssst, Les was talking about a device to regulate engine speed. Automatically.
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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Tue Sep 03, 2019 12:37 am

richc wrote:
Mon Sep 02, 2019 7:53 pm
I’m not trying to change the purpose of Matt G’s original post about his great Model T buzz saw – I love it...
Rich,
Actually I think your comments are in line with my purpose. Namely, to discuss everything on this old contraption. I really appreciate your insight, research and sharing!

When I got this home and looked at the serial number/casting date I was a bit disappointed thinking it was not a brass era engine. Then Wayne posted his comments and I encouraged. Now I have some questions:
  • A November 2, 1915 engine would go on a 1916 model T. Is that correct? When did the model year start?
  • The HCCA defines a Horseless Carriage as a "vehicle built or manufactured prior to January 1, 1916." How would one find out if this engine was placed in a car prior to January 1st?
Duey,
Thanks for your comments about how nice the engine looks inside. I agree it is amazing even in a dry area like here. I think it must have been in a covered area (i.e. barn) where the dust built up over the oil. But no one has commented with at least one issue that I see inside the engine.

I hope that others get my humor about the engine speed regulator:)

Matt

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Thorlick » Tue Sep 03, 2019 10:15 am

one of my favorite videos on YouTube was posted by Robert Metz. I suggest you view it!

https://youtu.be/0U31vL8s-uE

TH
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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by art32mor » Thu Sep 05, 2019 1:42 am

That vid great Terry saw few year ago
Only got about 1/2 cord chopped time to go fell another 80+ foot tree

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Sun Sep 29, 2019 12:37 pm

This is a better photo of the issue I was trying to see if anyone can figure out earlier.
9A261336-0222-463B-A2F0-904C3D3CB0A3.jpeg
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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Sun Sep 29, 2019 12:40 pm

Here is my fix.
70D300AC-D3C5-428E-A6ED-A8EFEEB31A02.jpeg
What a pain to do this from the bottom side of the engine! Fortunately it was only number two and number three cylinders. I couldn’t have done it for the number four cylinder. I’m used to the later for drip pan engines. I can see how much of an improvement is.

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Sun Sep 29, 2019 12:41 pm

Now I have a question:

Before I put the inspection cover back on. I wanted to verify that the oil line is working. I put some oil actually 2 quarts in the reservoir of the oil pan. I hand cranked it and didn’t see any oil come out the oil line.

Do you have any advice?

Matt

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by perry kete » Sun Sep 29, 2019 1:52 pm

If you can access one end of the line try injecting air thru the line with your compressor. I had a line that was plugged solid with old cotton lint and dirt and tried air but ended up taking it out and running a stiff wire thru it.
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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Sun Sep 29, 2019 3:35 pm

Perry,
I know that the line can be plugged. It sounds like you had to really tear down the engine!

Before I do that I was wondering if there is a easy way to verify that it is plugged?

Matt

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Sat Oct 19, 2019 2:02 am

A member contacted me regarding a Buzz saw that they are building. He was looking for some info, so I thought I would post it hear and get others input.

First here is some other examples of Model T Buzz saws:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/50 ... 1435189210

Info on Model T Governors:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/17 ... 1300190691
I know I have seen some that are powered by the fan, but couldn't find them. Perhaps someone else can.

From what I can tell it seems like 2:1 or even 3:1 pulley ratios were popular. That would mean that the saw was running at 2 to 3 times the speed and 1/2 to 1/3 the torque. Assuming 2:1 ratio and using the following chart would yield the following results:
  • 400 engine RPM the saw would move at 800 RPM with 4 HP
  • 800 engine RPM the saw would move at 1600 RPM with 12 HP
  • 1200 engine RPM the saw would move at 2400 RPM with 18 HP

I would imagine that they would run the engine on the lower RPM and yield around 5-10 HP. With the large diameter blade you need some higher HP, but when you compare this with a chain saw or table saw that certainly seems ample.
model T torque vs speed.jpg
model T torque vs speed.jpg (61.04 KiB) Viewed 3937 times
No mater how you look at it in 1930 a old Model t chassis would make a cheap power plant with plenty more power than needed. I wonder how important a governor would be needed. As long as the engine didn't bog down it seems like the governor may be more work than it is worth. On the other hand if the engine had to be forced to a higher speed that may be dangerous to run the saw at a speed higher than it should safely operate.

I have never designed a system like this, so I would love to hear others insight.

Matt


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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by bud delong » Sat Oct 19, 2019 9:28 am

The way [that] buzz rig is built you can control it easily with the throttle because you will not cut anything large on [that] buzz rig.I would hit the blade with a small hammer to see if it rings like a bell. If it rings look it over real good and make sure it is sharp. No ring or a dull thud,it is cracked and do NOT use it!!! The size of the blade will tell you the speed the saw is run at. Make sure that rig is solid before using,a tight belt,sharp saw,and start with small 2-3" wood to learn with.BE CAREFUL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Bud. :D

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Charlie B in N.J. » Sat Oct 19, 2019 9:46 am

that thing looks dangerous as hell just sitting there.
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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Steve Jelf » Sat Oct 19, 2019 9:58 am

We've seen the casting date, but not the serial number. That would tell the date of engine assembly. That won't exactly tell you when the engine was put into a car, but it would have been within a few days.

I believe you can run a wire through the oil tube with the hogshead off.
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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Original Smith » Sat Oct 19, 2019 10:05 am

There is a video around that I've seen a couple of times. It shows a guy driving a '25 pickup down a dirt road to a place where there is a Model T saw. It shows him cutting up enough wood to fill up the bed of the pickup, and then he drives off.

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Steve Jelf » Sat Oct 19, 2019 10:38 am

There is a video around that I've seen a couple of times.

Out west in BC. Note that he gets into his Canadian T from the left side.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0U31vL8s-uE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LMv_Y4axYw
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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Tue Jul 21, 2020 2:56 am

Today I got the engine started. I believe it was likely the first time in 40 years. The engine was not hard to start. It wasn’t any more difficult than starting my car! I primed it and cranked a couple times then it started. It took a bit to understand the levers, but as soon as I did it worked perfectly.
02E7E646-8249-4DFF-801D-EBE436C3CF10.jpeg
The fun part is I have a young man in high school helping me. Part of the reason that I have taken the time I have is I try to only work on this project with him. He thinks he wants to get into auto mechanics. But never had a chance to turn a wrench until now!

From memory here is what we did:
1. Mechanical:
  • Opened transmission inspection plate. Added: Magnet, Ford Faithful with clear external oil line. I am not sure if internal one is working.
  • Dropped oil inspection plate. Verified everything looked good. Cleaned pan. Removed the horse shoes that accept the plate mounting bolts cleaned out dirt, grease and metal filings. Added tie wire to wrist pins.
2. Gas:
  • Removed/Cleaned carburetor. Replaced float with a brass one.
  • Gas line was connected, added gas tank, valve. But tank had some rust in it and likely blocked copper line. So I added my trust gas tank that has rubber hose, filter, modern ball valve shutoff and shutoff valve at carb. This is a very handy set up I have used in getting engines started for others. It is a pain to fill a tank and deal with all the gas issues to figure out the status of an engine that is in the moth balls.
3. Electrical
  • Coil box on engine is really neat. It is likely the original 1915 put on top of engine, but I believe the wood was too far gone and the switch may have issues. I opted to add a modern 1926 style coil box that I have.
  • Timer was just lightly serviced. Emery cloth (more than lightly) was used to clean contacts. All connectors were removed, nuts were wire wheeled.
  • Wires were shot. This and the damage to the coil box make me think this car sat out for a very long time. I along with my helper used original connectors from the timer to the coil box. Original spark wires from the 1926/27 box were used, but they are very brittle so caution was used to avoid shorting.
  • Spark plugs were a mixed lot. They could have been used, but the clip on tops, plus one with a broken screw influenced my decision to just get some extras that I had.
  • Battery. My mom has some medical equipment that flashed time to change the 24VDC battery. I took apart the batter to find that it was constructed of two 12 VDC batteries. They are very nice and portable for something like this.
  • Switch was just a simple toggle switch between Mag and battery. Yes, I found that the Mag does work!
5. Coolant
  • I just ran it for a couple of ~30 second runs with 30 + minutes between. But this is on my short too do list.
Or in short, I added a coil box, wires, spark plugs, battery, gas tank and some elbow grease and this thing had no problem getting started.

The interesting thing is that this test stand did not come with a front axle. I added one without the spring because with the spring it would be much higher than the back. But without tires the front end now is lower than the back. In any case I used a clear tube and could see that there was oil in the front of the engine due to the forward tilt. But also interesting was that with this forward tilt I wasn't getting flow through the Ford Faithful. Perhaps a shorter thinner line would be better.

Maybe I am a year late, but still could be ready for winter:)

Matt
Last edited by Matt in California on Tue Jul 21, 2020 2:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.


Allan
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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Allan » Tue Jul 21, 2020 3:42 am

Matt, I suggest that while you have the inspection plate off, you take out the horse shoes that accept the plate mounting bolts. There will be heaps of crud lodged between the horse shoes and the sides of the pan. Now is the time to clean it out.

Allan from down under.

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by RajoRacer » Tue Jul 21, 2020 11:47 am

I would re-install the cotter pins into the wrist pin clamps just like they were - I've witnessed "wire" fail in that position.


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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by gclaytonsr » Tue Jul 21, 2020 12:32 pm

I totally agree with Charlie. Those things are dangerous.
There used to be a few around N.J. when I was a kid.
Some were a chassis with a belt running off the rear wheel.
Hit a knot and you were cutting more than wood !

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Matt in California
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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Tue Jul 21, 2020 2:06 pm

Steve, Your comment about reinstalling the cotter pins was my laugh for the day. The cotter pins do really well sitting there in the head of the bolt. :lol:

Gorden, I havn't been real clear. I don't intend to use the saw. I don't plan to hook up a belt and the shaft is actually rusted in place at the moment. I do like the engine stand especially the throttle and timing lever. I have used other engine stands, but you needed a steering wheel installed. It is nice that this is right there in the front.

Allan, I agree and did remove the horse shoes that accept the plate mounting bolts. There was lots of grease, dirt and metal parts to be removed. I will edit the post I made earlier to include that. Part of the reason that I posted is that it is my philosophy that the things that I did mechanically should be inspected on any engine like this prior to starting. I feel too many people would just start the engine for the thrill of it and risk having unnecessary issues.

Matt

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by RajoRacer » Tue Jul 21, 2020 7:02 pm

I reviewed the piston photo - one leg of the pin SHOULD be pointed down along the rod !

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by RajoRacer » Tue Jul 21, 2020 7:03 pm

If you're in doubt Matt, look in the Ford "Bible" for installing a cotter pin in the wrist pin bolt.


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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by DHort » Tue Jul 21, 2020 8:28 pm

Hope that you are reading Hank's post about helping the young men. You guys are an inspiration.

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by Matt in California » Wed Jul 22, 2020 1:57 am

Steve, my apologies, I thought you were joking. I appreciate you sharing your experience and wisdom. I have seen where the cotter pins wiggle so much they wear most of the way through the head. It doesn’t seem like the best practice. But here is the quote chapter and verse!
40A2C8DD-6F8E-432D-B305-C0F262EC43DB.jpeg
FDFE1DD3-F854-40DE-9BAB-EFC529C6B4AD.jpeg

David, I did see the post. It is always inspiring to see teenagers get involved!

Matt

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by RajoRacer » Wed Jul 22, 2020 11:09 am

No worries, Matt - early on in my "learning" years, I used safety wire on my own engine work and found wire pieces during an oil change & trans. screen cleaning - Yep, want to guess where it came from ?

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Re: Winter is coming, time to cut wood. Model T buzz saw

Post by RustyFords » Wed Jul 22, 2020 12:47 pm

Every time I see one of these Model T saws, I immediately think of a blade sharpening business my dad used to patronize when I was a kid.

The man who owned it was missing his legs and sat in a wheelchair. Behind the counter, he had a giant circular blade (more than 6' in diameter) mounted horizontally, that was about waist height and he'd wheel himself right up to the giant spinning blade and sharpen your item. No safety features...just the giant spinning blade.

He caught me staring with wide eyes and mouth agape one time and told me that he got too close to the blade and it chopped his legs off. My little kid mind was sent racing of course and I never forgot it.

My dad told me many years later that the guy lost his legs in WW2.

I'm sure that same line was used on countless kids over the years. :D
1924 Touring

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